Careers Service Occupations

Events Management

Events Management

About

According to Eventbrite the UK events industry is worth £39.1 billion and events are responsible for 35% of the UK visitor economy. 

Developments in the use of technology at events is a current trend with 61% of industry professionals planning to use mobile apps for events this year C&IT, State of the Industry Report 2016, (PDF: 1.85MB).

Opportunities in events management are available all over the UK, often in larger cities where events and conferences are regularly held. 

Careers advice

Industry news

Professional bodies

These represent people working in the sector, providing training and networking opportunities. They often provide careers support for students and graduates.

They also provide development for people already working in the sector. Follow them on LinkedIn, or visit their websites for news, contacts, work experience and vacancies.

The main professional associations for this sector include:

Making contacts 

Making contacts is essential for success in this sector. Many jobs in this field come through networking and speculative applications. You could start with:

Social media, particularly LinkedIn and Twitter, is useful for making contacts, finding employers and opportunities. Find out more about how to use social media for your career 

Subscribe to our Events Management twitter list and see Eventbrite’s article on the top 116 event-related twitter accounts to check out

Events

Recruitment fairs, open days, talks and other events give valuable insight and opportunities to make contacts.

For events listings see Careers Service events and External Events.

Related sectors

You may also be interested in Hospitality & CateringLeisure, Sport & Tourism, Marketing and Public Relations.

Or see our other occupational pages for more options.

Roles & Skills

The following job profiles include descriptions of typical duties, entry requirements and case studies.

Event organiser

Events manager

Exhibition designer

Conference centre manager

Conference and exhibition organiser

Skills employers look for

  • excellent organisational, project management and planning skills
  • flexibility and the ability to work well under pressure
  • a customer focussed approach
  • strong communication, interpersonal and negotiation skills
  • creativity, initiative and strong problem-solving skills
  • an ability to lead and work effectively in teams

Gaining Experience

Events management is an expanding and popular area. It is competitive at both entry and top management level.

Entrants often have business qualifications with related experience, but this area of work is open to all graduates who can demonstrate relevant skills. Work experience can be invaluable in developing relevant skills and demonstrating commitment to recruiters.

Finding work experience

Experience in sales, marketing, retail, tourism, or a customer service setting could help to demonstrate key organisational, interpersonal and team-working skills to potential employers.

Organising events for a university society can help to develop relevant skills. You can also gain experience by taking on a voluntary role or organising events for a charity. Go Volunteer offers Newcastle University students volunteering projects. See Volunteering for more opportunities.

Gain experience by working or volunteering at local events. See North East England and What's on North East  for regional event listings.

JobsOC, an on-campus jobs agency, offers temporary and casual work assignments in the university to current students. Assignments can include events support roles. These include graduation marshals, alumni promotions, exhibition assistants and assisting at open days.

Internships

The Association of Event Organisers members sometimes advertise student placements.

Charities such as Cancer Research and Macmillan offer voluntary summer internships in events. 

See work experience for more internship sources.

Specialist recruitment agencies

Finding companies

Smaller organisations often don’t advertise opportunities. You can contact them with a speculative approach. This is a common way of gaining experience and building contacts in the events sector. Find organisations that interest you and get in touch, always with a named contact. Be specific about why you are writing to them and what you’re looking for. 

Show your enthusiasm for the sector and highlight any relevant skills. Don’t give up if you don’t get a reply – follow up with a phone call or email to show that you’re keen.

Finding Jobs

Competition is strong, especially for entry-level positions. Use the following resources to find advertised vacancies and research employers for speculative applications.

Vacancy sites

Specialist recruitment agencies

See graduate jobs for more vacancy sources.

Finding companies

Find organisations that interest you and get in touch, always with a named contact. Be specific about why you are writing to them and what you’re looking for. Show your enthusiasm for the sector and highlight any relevant skills. Don’t give up if you don’t get a reply – follow up with a phone call or email to show that you’re keen.

Self-employment

Being self-employed or working as a freelancer is common in the events sector.

START UP provide information on activities and support for eligible Newcastle students and graduates interested in self-employment.

COBRA provides factsheets and reports on starting up and running a business. COBRA can only be accessed through a University computer on the Newcastle campus.