Careers Service Occupations

Architecture, Planning & Landscape

Architecture, Planning and Landscape

About

Careers advice

General

Architecture

Planning & urban design

Landscape

Industry news

Architecture

Planning & urban design

Landscape

Professional bodies

These represent people working in the sector, providing training and networking opportunities. They often provide careers support for students and graduates. They also provide development for people already working in the sector. Follow them on LinkedIn, or visit their websites for news, contacts, work experience and vacancies.

The main professional associations for this sector include:

Architecture

Planning & urban design

Landscape

Making contacts

Making contacts is essential for success in this sector. Many jobs in this field come through networking and speculative applications. You could start with:

Social media, particularly LinkedIn and Twitter, is useful for making contacts, finding employers and opportunities. Find out more about how to use social media for your career.

Events

Recruitment fairs, open days, talks and events give insight and opportunities to make contacts. 

For events for this sector see Careers Service events and External Events.

Related sectors

You may also be interested in Property and Surveying and Civil Engineering, Geomatics and Construction or see our other occupational pages for more options.

Roles & Skills

The following job profiles include descriptions of typical duties, entry requirements and case studies.

Architecture

Architect

Architectural technologist

Architectural technician

Planning & urban design

Planning and development surveyor

Town planner

Urban designer

Landscape

Landscape architect

Garden designer

Skills employers look for

  • strong design, drawing and drafting skills
  • a creative approach, paired with an analytical mind and strong problem-solving skills 
  • practical skills with the ability to work with accuracy and attention to detail
  • project management, organisational and planning skills
  • IT skills and a proficiency in computer-aided design software
  • leadership and the ability to work effectively in a team

Gaining Experience

Getting into architecture, planning and landscape is competitive. Work experience is invaluable in developing relevant skills. It also demonstrates your interest and commitment to recruiters.

Architecture

Several large companies offer internships, for example, Aaron Evans Architects and Aukett Swanke. Applications generally open around September, with closing dates as early as October and November.

For more information see:

Finding companies

Find companies that interest you and get in touch, always with a named contact. Be specific about why you are writing to them and what you’re looking for. Show your enthusiasm for the sector and highlighting any relevant skills. Don’t give up if you don’t get a reply – follow up with a phone call or email to show that you’re keen.

Planning & urban design

Getting into town planning is competitive. Relevant ways of getting experience could include:

  • internships with large companies, for example, Savills and DHA (openings around September)
  • planning assistant jobs, which allow you to gain extensive experience but are competitive
  • administrative jobs in planning departments, advertised on sites such as Local Government Jobs or jobsgopublic
  • volunteering for organisations such as Planning Aid England where opportunities include consultancy and community engagement

RTPI offer guidance on finding work placements in the UK. Although aimed at international trainee planners, the advice on approaching planning professionals is useful.

Finding companies

Find companies that interest you and get in touch, always with a named contact. Be specific about why you are writing to them and what you’re looking for. Show your enthusiasm for the sector and highlight any relevant skills. Don’t give up if you don’t get a reply – follow up with a phone call or email to show that you’re keen.

Landscape

Volunteering with non-profit environment and landscape organisations can help you to develop relevant skills. For example, Groundwork and Green Spaces for People have projects to get involved in. 

Finding companies

Speculative applications are commonly used to gain landscape architecture experience. Search for government departments, traders and non-profit organisations to contact using the following resources:

Specialist recruitment agencies

Finding Jobs

Competition is strong, especially for entry-level positions.

Use the following resources to find advertised vacancies and research employers for speculative applications.

Vacancy sites

General

Graduate & entry level jobs

Public sector jobs

Opportunities for employment within property and construction are commonplace within the public sector. Use the following specialist websites to help you look for opportunities in this area:

Architecture

Also see vacancy sources listed under 'general'.

Landscape

Also see vacancy sources listed under 'architecture' and 'general'.

Planning & urban design

Also see vacancy sources listed under 'architecture' and 'general'.

Specialist recruitment agencies

Finding companies

Find companies that interest you and get in touch, always with a named contact. Be specific about why you are writing to them and what you’re looking for. Show your enthusiasm for the sector and highlight any relevant skills. Don’t give up if you don’t get a reply – follow up with a phone call or email to show that you’re keen.

Architecture

Landscape

Planning & urban design

See Researching Employers for more information on finding organisations.

Study & training

Entrance into these sectors typically requires a university degree or professional qualification.

Architecture

To become a qualified architect it generally takes seven years of study and training. The standard route is:

  • Part 1: a BA or BSc-approved degree in architecture generally completed in three years
  • Stage 1 practical experience: 12 months recorded practical experience under a qualified architect or construction specialist
  • Part 2: a BArch, Diploma or MArch degree generally completed in two years
  • Stage 2 practical experience: another 12 months recorded practical experience. This makes up 24 months needed for part 3.
  • Part 3: a final qualifying examination in professional practice and management

Once you've completed all parts, you can register with the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

For further information see:

Funding

RIBA have detailed information about funding on their website, including information on financial help.

Landscape

To become a qualified landscape architect, you will need to complete a degree accredited by the Landscape Institute (LI). The degree takes four years.

If you have a degree that isn’t accredited, you can complete a LI postgraduate conversion course, taking up to two years to complete. The entry requirements for a conversion course can vary depending on the university. Check with each university to find out.  

For further information see Be a Landscape Architect careers website from the LI. This includes information on accredited courses.

Planning & urban design

For most careers in town planning and urban design, you will need a qualification accredited by the RTPI.

See Further Study for more information on finding, funding and applying for courses or come and talk to an adviser. No appointment is needed.