Publication:

Changes in a SWI4,6-DNA-binding complex occur at the time of HO gene activation in yeast (1991)

Author(s): Taba MR, Muroff I, Lydall D, Tebb G, Nasmyth K.

  • : Changes in a SWI4,6-DNA-binding complex occur at the time of HO gene activation in yeast

Abstract: The yeast HO gene is transcribed transiently during G1 as cells undergo START. START-specific HO activation requires two proteins, SWI4 and SWI6, which act via a motif (CACGA4) repeated up to 10 times within the URS2 region of the HO promoter. We identified a DNA-binding activity containing SWI4 and SWI6 that recognizes the CACGA4 sequences within URS2. Two forms of SWI4,6-DNA complexes called L and U can be distinguished by their electrophoretic mobility. L complexes can be detected at all stages of the cell cycle, but U complexes are only detected in cells that have undergone START. The formation of U complexes may be the trigger of HO activation. The SWI6 protein is concentrated in the nucleus throughout G1, but at some point in S or G2 significant amounts accumulate in the cytoplasm. This change in cellular location of the SWI6 protein might contribute to the turnoff of HO transcription after cells have undergone START.

Notes: 0890-9369 Journal Article

  • Short Title: Changes in a SWI4,6-DNA-binding complex occur at the time of HO gene activation in yeast
  • Date: Nov
  • Journal: Genes and Development
  • Volume: 5
  • Issue: 11
  • Pages: 2000-13
  • Publication type: Article
  • Bibliographic status: Published

Keywords: Base Sequence Cell Cycle/genetics DNA, Fungal/*metabolism DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/*metabolism Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific/*genetics Fungal Proteins/genetics/*metabolism Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal/*physiology Genes, Fungal/genetics Kinetics Molecular Sequence Data Precipitin Tests Promoter Regions (Genetics)/genetics Protein Kinases/metabolism Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*genetics *Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism

Staff

Professor David Lydall
Professor of Genome Stability