School of Computing

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International research collaboration for landslide risk reduction in India

Scientists from nine organisations in the UK are collaborating to improve the assessment of landslide risk, early warning systems and the preparedness of local communities likely to be affected by landslide hazards in India.

Physical scientists, engineers and social scientists from nine organisations in the UK (including Computing Science at Newcastle University), Italy and India are collaborating to improve the assessment of landslide risk, early warning systems and the preparedness of local communities likely to be affected by landslide hazards in India. This will help to protect lives, livelihoods and the local economy of vulnerable landslide-prone communities in India.
 
The project consortium of 36 scientists and engineers is co-led by Dr Helen Reeves from the British Geological Survey (BGS) and Professor Bruce Malamud from King’s College London (KCL) with the other project partners from the Amrita University, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection), the Geological Survey of India (GSI), Computing Science at Newcastle University, UK Met Office, Practical Action Consulting India and Practical Action Consulting UK. LANDSLIP will support the risk reduction concerns of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) which has been endorsed by more than 180 countries in the world.
 
The Newcastle PI for this project is Raj Ranjan who leads the research work on real-time sensor and social media data analytics while Co-I is Philip James (CEG) who contributes his skill on big data integration.
 
Landslides affect a large area of India from the Himalayas in the north, the sub-Himalayan region in the north-east, the Western Ghats in the south and the Konkan Plains in the west. Landslides are triggered by intense rainfall, snow melt, earthquakes and the impact of developments such as transport routes, mining and farming. Landslides have a direct impact on dense settlements, particularly hill towns, National Highways, strategic trade corridors and UNESCO world heritage sites located in these fragile mountain terrains. Landslides can cause fatalities, destruction of property, damage to infrastructure and disruption of livelihoods. This has a disproportionate effect on vulnerable sections of the communities in these areas.
 
Read more about the collaboration in the following press releases: British Geological Society, Telegraph India, Net India, Yahoo News.
 
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published on: 25 January 2017