Publication:

Convergence and divergence in grammar (2005)

Author(s): Cornips L, Corrigan KP

    Notes: This paper was commissioned by Auer/Hinskens/Kerswill - the recipients of an award funded by the European Science Foundation to establish a research network on social dialectology (1995-1998). ‘Dialect Change’ represents the culmination of the network’s activities “distilling the essence of this new research area with a coherence that would not have been possible without the network and the many cross-national links it fostered”. The collaborative research for our particular contribution (55% by me) was made possible by our award of a British Council/Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Exchange Fellowship so that I could work with Cornips at the Meertens Research Institute, Amsterdam. The chapter was independently refereed and begins with a critical review of the most salient current theoretical frameworks for analysing processes of convergence and divergence cross-dialectally. Using data from microvariation in Dutch and English dialects, its main goal is to take up the challenge of Wilson and Henry (1998) to demonstrate that combining insights from generative syntax and sociolinguistics enhances our understanding of the mechanisms of linguistic variation and change. The new paradigm sketched in this paper became the cornerstone of the subsequent joint book project for Benjamins’s CILT series also published in 2005.

      • Book Title: Dialect Change : Convergence and Divergence in European Languages
      • Pages: 96-134
      • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
      • Publication type: Book chapter
      • Bibliographic status: Published
        Staff

        Professor Karen Corrigan
        Prof of Linguistics & English Language