Dr Ruth Connolly
Senior Lecturer

Research

I have just embarked on an edition of Ben Jonson's poetry with Tom Cain, for the Longman's Annotated English Poets Series.  I am also in the initial stages of a monograph project exploring the body and affect in seventeenth-century poetry and I am working with colleagues in History and Music on a project to recover the history of print and musical literacy in Newcastle between 1500 and 1800. 

 

 My other interests lie in the field of early modern women's writing, particularly life-writing and in investigating this I have focussed  especially on the writings of Katherine Boyle Jones, Viscountess Ranelagh (1614-91) and Mary Boyle Rich, Countess of Warwick (1624-1678). As a result of working on an edition of Robert Herrick's Complete Poetry and on the Jonson edition  I  have become increasingly engaged with editorial theory and through this route with work in the digital humanities.

 

Research Roles

I am one of the co-convenors of the Medieval and Early Modern Research group at Newcastle. Our website is here: http://research.ncl.ac.uk/mems/.

Esteem Indicators

IRCHSS Funded Doctoral student (2001-2005)

Pforzheimer Visiting fellow at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas (September 2008)

Visiting Fellow, Folger Shakespeare Library, (October 2008)

The Complete Poetry of Robert Herrick won the Ronald H. Bainton Prize for Best Reference Work which is awarded by the Sixteenth-Century Society. (2014)

 

Undergraduate
Third Year 

 SEL 3303: Writing Rebellion: Literature and the English Revolution

SEL 3362: Dissertation in English Literature

Second Year (UG)

SEL 2201: Writing the Renaissance

SEL 2218: Research Project in English and History

 
Postgraduate


SEL 8188  Reading the Past II

SEL 8353 Manuscript, Print, Digital  I

SEL 8647 Manuscript, Print, Digital II

 PhD Supervision

I welcome students interested in seventeenth-century poetry and prose; manuscript and print culture; editing; women's writing, particularly life-writing and the relationship between gender, knowledge and authority in the early modern period.