School of Engineering

Staff Profile

Federico Prini

Research Associate

Background

Introduction

I am a research associate in the Marine, Offshore and Subsea Technology Group, School of Engineering. I am also registered for a PhD in marine hydrodynamics and structures.

Background

I earned a Bachelor degree in Nautical Engineering from Genoa University (Italy). The course granted me with a sound engineering knowledge and insight into the design and production of pleasure craft.  During my studies I won an ERASMUS scholarship for an academic semester at the University of Malta and gained internship experience with the yacht-building company Ferretti Group.

I then earned a Master degree in Small Craft Design (first class) from Newcastle University. During my studies I had the opportunity to further increase my expertise in the structural, hydrodynamic and powering aspects of high-speed craft and sailing yachts. My dissertation research project addressed the structural design of composite marine propellers. I investigated, with finite element method, the effect of the laminate lay-up on the structural response and deflection patterns of a large composite propeller blade. The study showed how hydroelastic effects could be positively exploited to increase the propeller hydrodynamic performance.

Current Position

I am Research Associate in the Marine, Offshore and Subsea Technology Group within the School of Engineering. My research focuses on the structural design of Search and Rescue Craft. The project, funded by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and supported by Lloyd's Register, sets out to improving the design, operation and maintenance practice of lifeboats.

I am currently registered for a PhD in marine hydrodynamics and structures, supervised by Prof Bob Dow, Prof Richard Birmingham and Dr Simon Benson.

Research

EDSARC - Enhanced Design of Search and Rescue Craft

  • Project dates: October 2014 - March 2018
  • Sponsor: Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI)
  • Partners: Royal National Lifeboat Institution, Lloyd's Register

The research addresses the structural design of Search and Rescue craft. The main aim is to provide the RNLI with new practical and theoretical expertise to improve design, maintenance and operational practice of its all-weather lifeboats. The project adopts a systematic approach based on numerical and experimental methods. An integrated hydrodynamic and structural model is developed and validated through extensive comparison with towing tank tests and full-scale seakeeping trials on an instrumented lifeboat. The response of the structure to the loads that are likely to be experienced during operation is evaluated and compared to the other limitations to speed when operating in rough seas. The numerical model and the knowledge and insight gained through the project are then exploited to generate practical tools of use to the RNLI and to others involved in the design and operation of high-speed craft in heavy seas.

Links:

Teaching

  • Attended ILTHE - Introduction to Learning and Teaching in Higher Education
  • Demonstrating tutorials for Marine Mechanics (Stage 1)
  • Delivered one-off lectures for Future Marine Projects (Stage 3)

Publications