The School of Geography, Politics and Sociology

Staff Profile

Dr Erica Pani

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

Background

I am a Post Doctoral Research Fellow on the project, Re-imagining Economies: Towards More Socially Inclusive Economic Geographies, run by the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology at Newcastle University. I have a BA in Cities, Economies and Social Change, an MSc in Human/Economic Geography, and a PhD in Economic Geography – all from Queen Mary, University of London (UK). My research (both to date and in its on-going forms) seeks to integrate a heterodox approach to economic geography with related sub-disciplines (such as geographies of finance, political geographies, refugee studies, and development studies) to understand how economies, economic activities and subjectivities might be re-imagined in more socially inclusive and ethically just ways.


Qualifications

PhD Economic Geography (ESRC), Queen Mary, University of London

MSc Human/Economic Geography (ESRC), Queen Mary, University of London

BA (hons) Cities, Economy and Social Change, Queen Mary, University of London


Memberships

Royal Geographic Society-Institute of British Geographers

Association of American Geographers


Awards and Honours

Winner of the Royal Geographic Society, Best PhD 2016, in the UK Economic Geography Research Group

2009-10, Drapers’ Co. Prize for Best Master’s Performance (Summa Cum Laude)

2009-10, Prize for Best Master ’s Dissertation (Distinction: 93)

2008-09, Drapers’ Co. Prize for Best Undergraduate Performance (Summa Cum Laude)

2008-09, A.E. Smalies Prize for Best Dissertation (1st Class: 92)

2008/09, Tavana Prize for Creative Writing

2007-08, June Sheppard Prize for Best Undergraduate Performance

2006-07, E.M. Rawston Prize for Best Undergraduate Performance

Research

Research Interests

I am an economic geographer with a primary interest in understanding how concrete economic geographies continuously emerge in time and space through multiple and complex social and political relations of value. The areas of economic activity that I have explored through this lens - at least in part - include: the marketisation of higher education in England; the unequal spatialities of global finance and financialization; and the increasingly important intersections between emerging economic geographies and forced migration. In each case, my aim has been to understand how new theoretical, conceptual and political possibilities can be re-imagined through a focus on values. Taking a heterodox, relational approach to economic geography, my research is distinctive, suggesting that what we value in life matters enormously to the form that our relationships give to emerging economic life worlds.


Current Work

The Re-imagining Economies Project at Newcastle University seeks to explore the ways in which economic geographies both are, and could be, more socially inclusive by rethink geographies of economies in innovative and interesting ways. Together with a broad range of actors, our aim is to re-imagine new theoretical, conceptual, policy and practical possibilities for more socially inclusive economic geographies in relation to four Research Domains: Inclusive Finance, Inclusive Governance and Regulation, Inclusive Work and Employment, and Inclusive Resource Networks.

A second strand of current research involves my on-going interests in exploring the emerging economic geographies of refugee reception in Italy. Across Europe, forced migration has become a significant social, political and economic issue given the large influxes of refugees from across the world. Often, in countries of departure we see persistent geographies of unequal growth, socio-economic marginalization and power relations continuing to mark the social landscape. However, in countries of arrival, the status of the refugee may be no less precarious depending on the degree to which she or he is integrated into the social, cultural, political and economic fabric of the host nation. Thus, the aim of this work is to critically analyse the value of refugee reception in Italy: how and where processes of reception function, for whom, and to what ends.

  

Teaching

Previous Academic Teaching

Post-graduate

2016-2017, Assistant Professor, GY454, Planning for Sustainable Cities, Regional and Urban Planning Studies, London School of Economics

2016-17, Part-time Lecturer, Methods in Regional and Urban Planning Studies & Local Economic Development, London School of Economics

2011-2017, Part-time Lecturer, Methods in Regional and Urban Planning Studies, London School of Economics

2011-2013, Part-time Class Assistant and Lecturer, Geographical Thought and Practice, Queen Mary University of London

 

Undergraduate Teaching

2016-2017, Associate Lecturer & Course Convener, GEG5129, Economic Geographies, Queen Mary University of London

2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, Class, Fieldwork and Research Assistant, Geographical Research in Practice, Queen Mary University of London

2010-11, 2012-13, Field Course Assistant, Urban Futures, Los Angeles and Las Vegas, Queen Mary University of London

Publications