Institute of Cellular Medicine

Staff Profile

Dr Shoba Amarnath

Newcastle University Research Fellow

Background

Background

I obtained a B.Sc. in Biochemistry from University of Madras, Chennai, India. I then moved to the University of Hull to pursue a M.Sc in Biotechnology and Molecular Biology. I stayed on in Hull on an Overseas Research Scholarship (ORS) award to continue my PhD with Prof. John Greenman. In 2005, I moved to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Institute at the National Institutes of Health, to pursue a post-doctoral fellowship with Dr.Wanjun Chen. In 2007, I joined Dr.Daniel H. Fowler's laboratory at the Experimental Transplantation Immunology Branch, NCI, NIH. During my time at the NIH, the main focus of my research has been understanding the basic biology of regulatory T cells and the various signalling networks that maintain regulatory T cell function. My research at NIH has led to two clinical trials, patents, FOCIS awards etc. I am also part of the NIH working group for bone marrow stromal cell transplant centre.


Qualifications

2000- B.Sc. Biochemistry, Madras University, Tamil Nadu, India

2001- M.Sc. Biotechnology & Molecular Biology, University of Hull, Hull, UK

2005- Ph.D Immunology, University of Hull, Hull, UK


Previous Positions

2015-Present: Newcastle University Research Fellowship, Newcastle University

2011-2015: Research Assistant Professor, NCI, NIH, USA

2007-2011: Post-doctoral Fellow, NCI, NIH, USA

2005-2007: Visiting Post-doctoral Fellow, NIDCR, NIH, USA


For any lab related resources/protocols please visit our laboratory website at

https://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/amarnath



Research

I am a T cell immunologist with specific interest and expertise in immune tolerance in autoimmunity and cancer. My research emphasis is: deciphering the cross-talk between T cell lineage specific transcription factors. I am also interested in identifying the impact of co-receptor signalling in T cell lineage determination and lineage maintenance during disease conditions such as autoimmunity.

Teaching

I have mentored numerous undergraduate, medical students, clinical fellows at the NIH.

I also lecture on T cells within the M.Res Immunobiology Module 

Publications