Publication:

Is GIFT (gamete intrafallopian transfer) the best treatment for unexplained infertility?[see comment] (1991)

Author(s): A. P. Murdoch;M. Harris;M. Mahroo;M. Williams;W. Dunlop

  • : Is GIFT (gamete intrafallopian transfer) the best treatment for unexplained infertility?[see comment]

Abstract: OBJECTIVE--To compare the cumulative pregnancy rates after gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) with the cumulative spontaneous pregnancy rates in couples with unexplained infertility. DESIGN--A contemporaneous study in a single group of patients. SETTING--Northern Regional Fertility Centre. SUBJECTS--76 couples with unexplained infertility of more than 3 years duration. INTERVENTIONS--Successful pregnancies were recorded during at least 3 months before GIFT and up to 21 months after a maximum of three cycles of GIFT treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Pregnancy resulting in a live birth. RESULTS--Average monthly fecundability without treatment was 0.021 and after GIFT was 0.14 (P less than 0.001). This was reflected as a cumulative pregnancy rate of 52% after three cycles of GIFT and 30% after 24 months without treatment. CONCLUSIONS--The chance of having a baby after one cycle of GIFT is significantly greater than the chance in a spontaneous cycle. However, considering the cumulative pregnancy rates, we suggest that if GIFT is to be a realistic treatment option, it should be offered for more than one cycle.

Notes: Comment in: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1992 Feb;99(2):169-70; PMID: 1554675

  • Short Title: Is GIFT (gamete intrafallopian transfer) the best treatment for unexplained infertility?[see comment]
  • Journal: British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
  • Volume: 98
  • Issue: 7
  • Pages: 643-7
  • Publication type: Article
  • Bibliographic status: Published

    Keywords: Adult Female *Gamete Intrafallopian Transfer Humans Infertility, Female/et [Etiology] *Infertility, Female/th [Therapy] Infertility, Male/et [Etiology] *Infertility, Male/th [Therapy] Male Pregnancy Prognosis Time Factors

    Staff

    Professor Alison Murdoch
    Professor of Reproductive Medicine and Head of Department