Institute of Neuroscience

Staff Profile

Dr Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza

Visiting Researcher


Research Interest

My research is focused on the study of human visual system. I use a combination of human psychophysics and computational modelling techniques to uncover the functional characteristics of the neuronal mechanisms of visual functions including motion perception, spatial vision, and stereovision.

In particular, I am interested in the role that neuronal inhibitory mechanisms have on our visual perception. These mechanisms are very interesting because they can enhance the detection of the borders of an image, can help to segregate a figure from the background, in some situations they can improve or impair motion discrimination, and even can reverse the perceived direction of motion. These inhibitory mechanisms can also suppress the image of one eye avoiding double image in people with strabismus. Basically my research is basic science, but I am increasingly working in collaboration with clinicians to examine these inhibitory mechanisms in clinical populations as schizophrenics, epileptics, or patients with depression. Our objective is to test these populations with simple visual tasks in order to develop new clinical tests that can be used to detect alterations in the inhibitory mechanisms of the brain.


2012-2015 Title: Spatial and functional characterisation of antagonistic centre-surround mechanisms in motion-vision. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Spain). PSI2011-24491. Awarded with 42,350€. (P.I. Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza)

2015-2017 Title: Visual inhibitory mechanisms in motion perception: Fundamental characteristics and clinical applications. Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (Spain). PSI2014-51960-P. Awarded with 59,290€. (P.I. Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza)

Pubmed publications

Google scholar webpage



My current position is Profesor Titular de Universidad at the Faculty of Psychology (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain).

I teach the following courses:

  1. Perception. Theory and practical classes: 190 hours/year. Number of students: 250/year second year Psychology students. Tutoring: 6 hours/week. For this course I have developed new practices that can be seen here.
  2. Signal Analysis with applications to vision and audition. Theory and practical classes: 50 hours/year. Topics: Fourier analysis, linear systems, image processing, edge detection, sound processing, etc. Number of students: 20/year fifth year Psychology students. Tutoring: 6 hours/week. This course is included in the specialty area of Experimental Psychology. In the practical classes of this course I teach MATLAB programing.