Cowen (Joseph) Tracts

Subject strengths: History, Politics

The Cowen Tracts are almost two thousand pamphlets which were formerly owned by local (radical) M.P., Joseph Cowen (1829-1900). The tracts date mostly from the mid- to late-Nineteenth Century and reflect Cowen's interest in the social, educational, political and economic issues of the day.

There is some earlier material, such as Deed of incorporation for the insurance of ships printed by T. Angus, St. Nicholas' Church-Yard, Newcastle (1778). Pamphlets were an effective form of public debate because they could be circulated to a wider audience than books and authors could remain anonymous. The Cowen Tracts discuss Irish politics, foreign policy, women's rights, religion, education and public health and include such titles as The Union programme for 1880: constructive, not destructive, Irish legislation [1879?], Are women fit for politics?: are politics fit for women [185-] and The education of the agricultural labourer: a paper read before the Morpeth Chamber of Agriculture, on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1870 by M.W. Ridley (1870).

 

Collection Name and Collection Reference Code:

Collection Name: Cowen (Joseph) Tracts

Library Ref Code: Cowen Tracts

Date Range of Material

1603 - 1879

Type of Material

Published pamphlet collection

Size of Collection

8 Linear Metres of shelving 

How To Order Items From This Collection

The books within this collection are described within the Newcastle University Library Catalogue and can be ordered directly from the catalogue.

This link to the library catalogue will show a list of all the items within the collection. Please note this link is available to members of the public as well as University staff and students.

You can then place your order by linking to our request form

Scanning and Photocopy Service

If you are unable to visit our reading room, we also have a scanning and photocopying service. 

Other Resources:

The tracts have also been digitised as part of a wider RLUK (Research Libraries UK) project to digitise important nineteenth-century pamphlets and the full-text can be accessed via JSTOR.