Faculty of Medical Sciences

Staff Profile

Sarah Moore

NIHR Clinical Lecturer and Research Physiotherapist

Background

My current role as an NIHR Clinical Lecturer allows me to lead on two research programmes investigating physical activity and gait after stroke, whilst continuing to practise as a physiotherapist in stroke care at Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. My role as a clinical academic allows to create and deliver complex research rpogrammes informed by my clinical experience. I am passionate about improving the patient experience after stroke and embedding research into clinical practice.


Research

My research focuses on stroke rehabilitation with a specialist interest in the fields of physical activity and exercise after stroke and gait rehabilitation. I was awarded an NIHR Clinical Lectureship in April 2016 which will allow me to explore participation in long-term physical activity after stroke. I have also recently been awarded a Stroke Association project grant which will investigate auditory rhythmical cueing to improve gait and physical activity after stroke.

My PhD focused on physical activity and the impact of cardiovascular exercise on brain atrophy and blood flow, metabolism, function and quality of life after stroke. This work led to the development of the Newcastle Fitness after Stroke service in collaboration with Newcastle City Council. The findings of my PhD have led to the research programme I will conduct as part of my Clinical Lectureship which will utilise a co-design approach to develop an intervention to enable long-term participation in physical activity post-stroke.

To enable the measurement of physical activity and temporal and spatial aspects of gait after stroke during my two research programmes I am currently collaborating with the Brain and Movement group at Newcastle University to explore the accuracy of using a single tri-axial accelerometer and related algorithms to measure these variables. I am also involved in another Stroke Association grant: WAVES, where the impact of an accelerometer-based device providing feedback on levels of upper limb movement is being trialled with people with stroke.  

Alongside research interests in stroke I have been an American College of Sports Medicine Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist since 2009 which has enabled me to lead and assist on a number of exercise research trials with participants with a range of chronic conditions including: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; diabetes; mitochondrial disease and sarcopenia. My skills as a clinical exercise specialist include maximal progressive exercise testing with collection of expired gases and 12 lead ECG, measurement of cardiac function using bioreactance and bioimpedance, metabolic testing, risk stratification, exercise prescription and implementation, objective and subjective measurement of physical activity and exercise counselling. This skill set supplements my 17 years experience as a physiotherapist and diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders.




Publications