Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

ARA3114 : Regionality and the Fall of Rome (Inactive)

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module aims to:

- Introduce students to the archaeology of the late Roman Britain and its regional complexity;
- Contextualise Britain’s regional complexity within the context of the North-Western Provinces;
- Demonstrate the complexity and diversity of late Roman Society;
- Explore the manner in which the Roman Empire and its neighbours responded to social, economic and political pressures.

Outline Of Syllabus

The third century saw the Roman Empire’s veneer of unity shattered as usurpers and regional emperors fought for their local interests. These competing loyalties and priorities were regularised at the end of the third century by Diocletian’s creation of the Tetrarchy, but were then subordinated to Constantine’s Empire. By the end of the fourth century the Empire was superficially unified but formally split into its eastern (Greek) and Western (Latin) halves. A century later the west was gone, replaced by a patchwork of ‘barbarian’ kingdoms and the East was beginning to follow a ‘Byzantine’ trajectory.

Understanding how the ideology of unity was created by the Empire and the complex regional, social, ethnic and economic geography of its inhabitants and neighbours is key to understanding why the Western Empire ‘Fell’. The regional patterns that were to re-emerge or coalesce after the fall of Rome would lay the foundations of Medieval Europe.

- Historical narratives and interpretive frameworks
- Military threats
- Paidea and shared values
- Material Culture and regionality

The course will have a one hour long lecture weekly and a two hour seminar or practical weekly. There will be a one day weekend field trip to York. This will allow us to visit the Yorkshire Museum and examine the defences of Eburacum.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture101:0010:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion531:0053:001/3 of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading531:0053:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesPractical22:004:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching112:0022:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesFieldwork16:006:00Field Trip to York
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study521:0052:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Jointly Taught With
Code Title
ARA8222Regionality and the Fall of Rome
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

The teaching methods provide students with a sounds basis of evidence, interpretation and theoretical approaches. These are developed in small group work and presentations where students explore and research issues independently and/or collaboratively. This allows students to develop their confidence, research sills and knowledge base.

Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire and they stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills. Seminars encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
PC Examination602A10A knowledge test to assess understanding of key terms and dates.
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M452000 Word essay
Essay2M452000 word essay
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Written exercise2MStudents are expected to present seminar papers and are asked to research and present specific topics to the group.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The essay allows students to develop their critical research skills and bibliographic skills. It will also engage them in time management.
The examination will test knowledge retention and ability to work under pressure.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable