Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

CAC2053 : Greek Myth (Inactive)

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

What is myth? Why do societies need it? Where did Greek myth come from? How should we understand great Greek myths such as the Succession Myth of the gods, the Prometheus and Pandora myths, the Myth of Ages, and the myth of Oedipus the King? Do the Freudians, Jungians and Structuralists make Greek myth relevant and important to us today? Did Greek myth influence the Christian story?

This module aims to provide an opportunity to acquire a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it and to develop the capacity for independent study.
Specifically, the aims of this module are to introduce students to the importance of Greek myth in Greek religion and society; to examine its sources; to understand and critically assess the most important modern theories of myth; and to interpret the major myths in the Theogony and Works and Days of the poet Hesiod, contemporary of Homer.

Outline Of Syllabus

We shall examine the following topics, in approximate order:

The range of meanings of the Greek word muthos, of ancient and modern attempts to define ‘myth’, and of the various practical distinctions that may be made.

The importance of Greek myth in Greek religion and society

The question of the extent and dating(s) of Near Eastern influence on early Greek myth.

Modern theories of myth and their practical application to the interpretation of myths.

Parallels between Greek myth and the story of Jesus.

In-depth interpretation of Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion541:0054:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture281:0028:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching61:006:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops12:002:00Workshop on texts studied independently.
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Jointly Taught With
Code Title
CAC3053Greek Myth
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire and they stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills.
Specifically, a basic lecture format is the most efficient method of expounding this material, which is both quite considerable and (sometimes) quite difficult. All lectures allow time for questions and (some) discussion. The 6 ‘practicals’ are devoted to ‘practice’ sessions considering possible exam questions and techniques of handling them. This is particularly important for context questions, which demand efficient and economical deployment of a wide range of interpretative skills.
Seminars provide students with an opportunity to participate in discussion and thus to improve their oral communication skills.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exam Pairings
Module Code Module Title Semester Comment
2N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written exercise2M100N/A
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Exams test acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided and to write clearly and concisely.
This particular exam format is flexible (students can choose freely between context questions and essays) and it avoids any danger of plagiarism, otherwise dishonest work or passive ingestion of material (the popularity of the topic means that there is a mass of secondary literature and Internet material, which could be passively deployed in coursework assessments).

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable