Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

CAC3057 : Greek and Roman Music (Inactive)

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

'Why does everyone enjoy rhythm and music?' asked the author of the pseudo-Aristotelian Problems (19.38). Music is, as the Greeks recognised, a universal human activity, and classical literature is, not surprisingly, permeated with references to music and music-making. Yet not everyone enjoys rhythm and music in the same way, and differences in musical values lend themselves readily to ethical and cultural interpretation. Not surprisingly, ancient authors did not always treat music-making as a culturally or morally neutral activity: it involved memory, creation, imitation and performance, and this meant that it was intimately tied up with notions of individual, ethnic, cultural, religious and gender identity. Music thus became a key component in Greek and Roman self-fashioning, and musical discourse was constantly used as a rhetorical tool for defining self and others.

The module will investigate the main themes of the Graeco-Roman musical experience: the instruments, the social and cultural contexts for music-making, attitudes to music and musicians, and scientific and theoretical approaches to understanding how music works. Surviving pieces of ancient Greek music will also be studied. By considering several different types of evidence (iconographical, archaeological, epigraphical, textual), students will become familiar both with the various types of ancient musical instruments, their construction and performance contexts, and also with the most prominent aspects of musical discourse in classical literature and the various purposes this discourse was made to serve (e.g. political, pedagogical, nostalgic) within Greek and Roman literary culture. The module presupposes no prior knowledge of music, and all texts will be read in translation.

Outline Of Syllabus

The module begins with an overview of the types of surviving evidence for music in Greek and Roman antiquity, and then progresses via a broadly chronological route from the Bronze Age to late Imperial times, examining several key themes in each historical context (as applicable): song and song-culture, instruments, contexts for music-making, the surviving scores themselves, the theoretical study of music, literary uses of music, and ancient attitudes to musical trends, practices and culture.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture241:0024:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion661:0066:0040% of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading651:0065:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching71:007:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops31:003:00Research skills development workshops
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery21:002:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study331:0033:0020% of guided independent study
Total200:00
Jointly Taught With
Code Title
CAC2057Greek and Roman Music
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures are used:
•       to introduce the types, characteristics and distribution of evidence for Greek and Roman music
•       to introduce the methods by which this evidence can be most effectively used in gaining knowledge about Greek and Roman music
•       to draw attention to key aspects of this evidence for further, independent study
•       to discuss the interpretation of the evidence, and the problems involved in its interpretation
•       to recommend secondary readings relevant to the interpretive problems raised, and highlight essential arguments and controversies in these readings
•       to challenge students to consider both the preconceptions they may have about music, and how these preconceptions may shape their interpretation of ancient music, musicianship and musical theory
Seminars are used:
•       to allow students to discuss a prescribed piece of secondary literature in a small group, in a conversation structured by seminar questions distributed in advance
•       to give students the opportunity to articulate their own arguments about an aspect of Greek and Roman music in some depth
•       to provide a supportive and constructive environment for developing, sharing and evaluating ideas that could form the basis for the coursework essay
Workshops are used:
•       to provide focussed instruction and practice in developing specific research skills assessed in the module (e.g. constructing a bibliography for an essay on Greek and Roman music, analysing musical iconography, commenting on a passage from an ancient musical author)
Surgeries are used:
•       to offer students the opportunity to consult teaching staff about preparing their coursework essay and revising for the exam, and to benefit from hearing the answers to others’ questions

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination902A60N/A
Exam Pairings
Module Code Module Title Semester Comment
2N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M402000 words on a topic chosen from a list provided
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The examination assesses:
•       the first three Intended Knowledge Outcomes
•       both Intended Skills Outcomes (with the exception of oral argument)
The essay assesses:
•       both Intended Skills Outcomes (with the exception of oral argument)
•       at least two of the Intended Knowledge Outcomes (which two will depend on the topic chosen)

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable