Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

CAH3033 : The Fall of the Roman Republic

Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

In this module we study the historical developments that led to the collapse of the Roman Republic and the advent of the monarchic rule of Octavian, later known as Augustus. It was a long and complex process, which spanned over more than a century and coexisted with the expansion and the development of Roman hegemony throughout the Mediterranean.

One of the central contentions of this course will be that the fall of the Roman Republic cannot be read simply as a process of decline. On the contrary, it was a dramatic and violent period of creative change, which was part of a wider process of reaggregation and reorganisation of the Roman State and of the Empire as a whole.

This module intends to offer an opportunity to:

- Gain a sound general knowledge of the period, both of the narrative of the last two centuries BC and of the main historical issues of the period;
- Read widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature about the period;
- Develop further the capacity for independent study.

Outline Of Syllabus

Our discussion will start in 168 BC, when the Roman victory at Pydna against a coalition of Greek forces made clear to everybody that there was no alternative to Roman hegemony in the Mediterranean. We will then embark on an analysis of the economic and social situation in Rome and Italy in the second century BC, and we will look at the changes that intervened in Roman politics as a consequence of that. We will then move on to a discussion of the role of the Italian Allies in this period and to the Social War, and to the consequences that this process had on the competition within the Roman elite. We will cover the main developments from the age of Sulla and Marius to the clash between Caesar and Pompey, and to the final clash between Octavian and Mark Antony. At the same time, we will show that these events must be explained against the background of complex economic and social processes, by looking at a wide range of evidence – literary, epigraphical, numismatic, and archaeological. The study of the political and military developments will be intertwined with the discussion of the key historical themes of the period. The seminars will be devoted to the close scrutiny of important pieces of evidence.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture301:0030:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching61:006:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery21:002:00Revision sessions
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study521:0052:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire and they stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills. Reading classes are devoted to the close reading and interpretation of important pieces of evidence (be it literary, documentary, archaeological, or iconographic) shedding light on an important aspect of the period under discussion.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1801A100N/A
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The unseen examination tests assess the students’ acquisition of a general and overall knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse problems quickly, to select from and apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided and to write clearly and coincisely.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable