Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

HIS1030 : Evidence and Argument

Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

Evidence and Argument is designed to give you an in-depth introduction to a particular historical debate within the field of expertise of the individual tutor, while also introducing you to the nature of historiographical debate more generally and to various research, reading and writing skills that you will need during your university career.

The seminars will begin with an introduction to the topic under discussion. You will then be asked to read and analyse a key article or chapter within that field. The content of the article/chapter will be analysed and discussed and you will also be guided in how to reference it correctly. In subsequent weeks you will be introduced to, or asked to find, other journal articles, essays from edited volumes and monographs (books) that deal with the same topic, but which disagree with the initial article or approach the topic from a different perspective. The seminars will be complemented by a series of lectures that will introduce you to historical debates on other topics.

By the end of the module you will therefore have built up a detailed understanding of one particular historical debate, but you will also have some understanding of how historical arguments and debates operate and of the skills involved in reading, analysing and commenting on a range of secondary sources. You should understand the differences between these types of source, and how to find, use and reference them for the purposes of your own research. These are understandings and skills that are central to the discipline of history, and that you will need to apply in all the rest of your history modules throughout your university career.

This module aims:

• To give students an in-depth introduction to a particular historical debate.
• To demonstrate the ways in which historical argument and debate operate.
• To introduce students to a range of historical writing – including journal articles, monographs and essays from edited volumes – and to guide them in the reading and analysis of secondary sources.
• To introduce students to various research, reading and writing skills required during their university career.
•To give students some small group experience.

Outline Of Syllabus

The following schedule offers an indication of how the module might be taught, individual tutors may vary this model to suit their particular topic.

Lectures (6 x 1 hour lectures)
Week 1 Introduction and meet your tutor
Week 2 The nature of historical debate 1
Week 3 The nature of historical debate 2
Week 4 Skills for learning
Week 5 Writing development centre lecture
Week 6 Careers

Seminars (8 x 2 hour seminars)
Week 1: No seminars
Seminar 1: Introduction - background on the topic
Seminar 2: The Orthodox Position 1: Analysis of the article
Seminar 3: The Orthodox Position 2: Other versions
Seminar 4: Revisionist Accounts
Seminar 5: New Approaches 1 - Monographs
Seminar 6: New approaches 2
Seminar 7: New Approaches 3
Seminar 8: Summary of the debate

Workshops (5 x 2 hour workshops)
Workshop 1: Library workshop (in week 1)
Workshop 2: Referencing and bibliographies
Workshop 3: Essay writing
Workshop 4: Essay 1 feedback
Workshop 5: Essay 2 surgery
Surgery time
4 hours of coursework surgery time

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture61:006:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion731:0073:0045% of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading731:0073:0045% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching82:0016:00Seminars based on 17 groups
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops52:0010:00Library Workshop based on 17 groups
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery41:004:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study181:0018:0010% of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

SEMINARS encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral presentation, interpersonal communication, problem-solving skills, research skills and adaptability.

LECTURES enable students to gain a wider sense of historical argument and debate and how such debates operate, which also allows them to develop comparisons between different historiographical debates.

WORKSHOPS: Workshops will focus on the key practical skills associated with the study of History, including: note-taking, academic reading, summarising, writing bibliographies, essay planning and writing, document analysis.

SURGERY TIME: Staff will make themselves available in their offices for four hours over the course of the module to see students individually on issues concerning them, although we expect this will focus on preparation for assessments.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay1A752,000 words
Essay1M25Assignment of 1,500 words
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Written exercise1MFormative exercises will be un-assessed, but will be discussed in the seminars and will feed into the assessed work.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

RELATIONSHIP TO LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining the student’s progress.
2. Summative term paper tests knowledge outcomes and develops skills in research and reading.

Formative exercises will also be set for this module. They will be un-assessed, but will be discussed in the seminars and will feed into the assessed work.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.
All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable