Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

HIS2047 : Twentieth-century Cuba: From Jose Marti to the Buena Vista Social Club (Inactive)

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

In many ways, Cuba is an exceptional country. It was one of the first American territories to be colonised by the Spanish, and one of the last to achieve its independence. Its cultural exports, rumba and salsa, have captivated generations of European youths, while its commercial exports, cigars and rum, have intoxicated many more. In terms of iconography, it is a world leader; since the 1960s, Newcastle students have used Che Guevara posters to hide nasty stains on bed-sit walls. Despite intense US pressure, Cuba remains one of the few surviving socialist nations in the world.

This module seeks to explore the diverse nature of Cuba’s exceptionality during the twentieth century. By placing political and economic analysis within the contemporary social and cultural context, among other things we’ll expose the long history of tensions between the United States and Cuba; we’ll analyse the legacy of African slavery in Cuban society and culture; and we’ll explore the many facets of Castro’s revolution, its consequences for ordinary Cubans and for revolutionary aspirants throughout the world. Finally, we’ll ask a question that has no easy answer: what happens to Cuba after Castro?

The aims of this module are:
1. To provide, through a range of genres, an appreciation of the salient features in C20th Cuban History.
2. To provide an opportunity of investigating some in depth selected problems and of acquiring a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the secondary literature associated with it.
3. To develop capacity for independent study.

Outline Of Syllabus

The lectures cover the topics in 'Intended Knowledge Outcomes', namely Cuba's twentieth-century history, including:
An overview of Cuba's colonial past, Jose Marti and the struggle for Independence, US foreign policy towards Central America and the Caribbean, Frustrated Nationalism: Life under the Platt Amendment, The Revolutionary Struggle, from Moncada to the Missile Crisis, Socio-economic reform in Castro's Cuba, Exporting Revolution, Cuba's foreign policy, Transition or Disintegration?
Salient issues in contemporary Cuba, AND specific themes in Cuba's twentieth-century society and culture, including: The Afro Caribbean experience: from Slavery to santeria, "reification" of the Revolution: icons, statues and public celebrations, Sugar and cigars: cultural considerations of Cuban agriculture, sport as a weapon of the Cold War, "Buena vista" or blurred vision? The experiences of Cuban exiles, Culture in Castro's Cuba.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion651:0065:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture241:0024:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading651:0065:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching13:003:00Film viewing, discussion session
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching52:0010:00Seminar
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study331:0033:0020% of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire. They also stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills.
Seminars provide students with an opportunity to participate in discussion and thus to improve their oral communication skills. As and when deemed appropriate, these sessions might be augmented and/or replaced by the viewing of films/documentaries or other pedagogic activities

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1352A75unseen
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M252000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining student progress. The exam tests acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided, and to write clearly and concisely.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable