Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

HIS3131 : China in Revolution

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module is revolution, violence, trauma, and its aftermath in twentieth century China. Key questions are: Why did many people want revolutionary change, and what kinds of visions were there for a new China? What explains the Communist victory over the Nationalist government, and the catastrophes that occurred under Mao’s rule? Beyond catastrophe, how did Chinese society change in the era of collectivization? How have people come to terms with the extraordinary violence of the mid-twentieth century? And why did a democratic transition take place in Taiwan, but not the People’s Republic? Attempts to make (and prevent) revolution defined Chinese politics for much of the twentieth century. Revolutionary movements struggled to unify China, and modernize its economy and culture; according to a plurality of visions of what ‘modernity’ meant. These struggles have shaped China to such an extent that without understanding them, understanding present-day China is impossible.

The aims of this module are:
1)       Students will be able to describe the key political, cultural, social, and economic changes that took place in twentieth century China.
2)       Students will be able to critically discuss a range of historians’ interpretations of these changes, and outline the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to twentieth century Chinese history.
3)       Students will be able to analyse the significance of primary sources (in translation) and relate them to what other historians have written.

Outline Of Syllabus

The following is a guide only. Actual subjects may differ from those listed.

Seminar 1: ‘A Madman’s Diary’ China in the 1910s
Seminar 2: The Age of Openness?
Seminar 3: Revolution of the Heart
Seminar 4: The Pre-War Communist Movement
Seminar 5: Total War
Seminar 6: ‘Liberation’ and Social Transformation in Rural China
Seminar 7: The Great Leap Forward and Famine
Seminar 8: Red Guards and Village Teachers
Seminar 9: Reckoning with the Past, part 1: Trauma and Post-Revolutionary Culture and Politics in the PRC
Seminar 10: Reckoning with the Past, part 2: Trauma and Memory in Nationalist Taiwan
Seminar 11: Chinese Democracy, part 1: Taiwan
Seminar 12: Chinese Democracy, part 2: The PRC + Review

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion651:0065:001/3 of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading651:0065:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching123:0036:00Seminars
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study341:0034:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Small-group teaching provides students with an opportunity to summarize and ask questions about the readings, and to improve their ability to engage in debate and discussion.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1802A75Unseen exam
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M25Essay/doc.commentary of 1,500 to 2,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Essays test students’ ability to conduct independent research, relate primary source documents to broader problem, ability to formulate an interpretation of evidence in response to a question, and academic writing skills.

Exams test students’ general knowledge, as well as their ability to quickly analyse a problem and formulate a clearly written answer, drawing broadly on the material covered by the course

The form of the resit is no different from the above, i.e. no marks are carried over from the sit to the resit. Students are not allowed to submit for the resit any work that they have previously submitted.

Submitted work, tests, intended knowledge and skills outcomes develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.
All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable