Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

HIS3227 : Latin America Through the Foreign Gaze

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

“Exotic”; “sultry”; “amazons”; “tropical”; “the land of mañana”; “fiery”; “underdeveloped” “violent”; “unstable”; “dictatorship”; “death squads”. These are just some of the many expressions that have, from the moments of encounter to the present day, characterised foreign depictions of Latin America and its inhabitants. In this module we get behind the stereotypes to understand the influences that fed into foreign perceptions and their consequences for the Latin American continent. Using primary sources from such individuals as explorers, travellers, diplomats, entrepreneurs, politicians, we will trace the ways in which such depictions have changed through the centuries of contact. While emphasis will be given to late C19th and C20th exchanges between the US and Mexico, we reach back to the early days of contact to assess the degree to which contemporary stereotypes of Latin Americans (in popular culture and elsewhere) represent continuity and change from the past. By analysing the development of foreign attitudes towards the Latin American continent, we will arrive at an appreciation of the complex, often contradictory, relationship between the New and Old worlds.

This module aims:
•To acquaint students with the diverse range of political, economic, military, socio-cultural influences that has affected the way in which foreigners have viewed Latin America and its inhabitants.
•To analyse the ways in which these influences and portrayals of Latin Americans have affected international relations and relationships between different groups within Latin American society.
•To provide an opportunity of investigating in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.
•To provide an opportunity to acquire a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it and to develop the capacity for independent study.
•To develop the capacity for independent study.

Outline Of Syllabus

Modules such as this are constantly evolving, but the content of the module will include some or all of the following themes/topics:
•       European preconceptions prior to contact and perceptions following encounter: the “Amazons”, “El Dorado”, and the search for Utopia
•       The landscape and early travellers
•       Trade, material and human exploitation
•       Social Darwinism + scientific/anthropological study of Latin Americans and the politics of race
•       Foreign enclaves within Latin American society
•       US domination of C20th portrayals of Latin America through anthropology, arts, tourism, cultural exchange, film
•       Latin America as a “hippie haven”
•       Celebration/commemoration of 500 yrs of co-existence
•       Tango, tequila and tourism – contemporary cultural contacts

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion541:0054:001/3 of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching123:0036:00Seminars
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Preparation for seminars develops teamwork, planning and organising, and encourages students to show initiative as leaders, and adaptability by compromising and negotiating with other team members. Active involvement in seminars allows students to develop their interpersonal skills and practice oral presentation of complex issues within a supportive environment. Seminars further encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1802A75N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written exercise2M25Essay/doc.commentary of 1,500 to 2,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Exams test acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided and to write clearly and concisely.

Documentary commentary exercises and examinations test knowledge and understanding of the texts set for the module. The ability to compare and contrast related source texts on a common subject. The ability to expound and criticize a textual extract lucidly, succinctly and with relevance in a relatively brief space, and, in an exam, under pressure of time.

Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining student progress. Submitted work tests knowledge outcomes and develops skills in research, reading and writing.

This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.
All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable