Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

HIS3279 : Popular Politics and Reform in Britain, 1811-1850

Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module offers an in-depth study of popular protest in the first half of the nineteenth century and engages in those debates which seek to explain why in the ‘age of revolutions’ in Britain there was no revolution at all. Of course, this is not to say that protest movements such as Chartism did not have revolutionary potential. One of the questions students will wrestle with is how this was diverted into reformism. Although Chartism has inevitably dominated the discussion of protest movements in this period, the module aims to locate Chartist activity in the wider context of reform activity. We will analyse events surrounding the Peterloo Massacre, Luddism, the Rebecca riots, political unionism and the Anti-Corn Law League.

The aims of this module are:
•To examine popular politics and reform in Britain between 1811 and 1850
•To identify a range of primary sources and contemporary publications
•To provide an opportunity to acquire a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it and to develop the capacity for independent study

Outline Of Syllabus

The syllabus will include some of the following themes:
1.Industrial society, 1780-1850
2.Politics, class and society in the first half of the nineteenth century
3.Economic change and Luddism
4.The Swing Riots
5.Political unions and the 1832 Reform Act
6.Crime and policing
7.The Chartist decade
8.Rebellious Wales: The Rebecca Riots and the Newport Rising
9.Middle class activism and the Anti-Corn Law League
10.Transforming the radical press
11.Britain and Europe: the age of revolutions?
12.The decline of Chartism and age of reform

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching123:0036:00Seminars
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study541:0054:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Seminars will encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral presentation, interpersonal communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability.

Lectures will provide an overview of the subject and general introduction to the relevant themes. They will also provide an introduction to the key historiographical and conceptual debates. They will impart core knowledge and an outline of the knowledge that students are expected to acquire. They will also stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1801A75N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay1M25Essay/doc.commentary of 1,500 to 2,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) due Friday 12pm teaching wk 7 Sem 1.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Exams test acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided and to write clearly and concisely.

Documentary commentary exercises and examinations test knowledge and understanding of the texts set for the module. The ability to compare and contrast related source texts on a common subject. The ability to expound and criticize a textual extract lucidly, succinctly and with relevance in a relatively brief space, and, in an exam, under pressure of time.

Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining student progress.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.
All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable