Study Abroad and Exchanges

Modules

Modules

HIS3285 : Post-Revolutionary Mexico: From Zapata to the Zapatistas

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

Twentieth century Mexico was a country of extremes: fiercely patriotic, yet deeply divided; crippling poverty, yet with more millionaires than elsewhere in Latin America; sympathetic to Castro’s Cuba, yet swift to crush youthful discontent within its own borders. This module follows Mexico’s trajectory along a process of political, social, and cultural centralisation. We begin with the messy aftermath of a revolution that exposed divisions between ethnic groups, social classes and family members. We trace the political, socio-economic, and cultural measures taken by the State to consolidate its power and to persuade all Mexicans that they had a stake in the future. We celebrate Mexico’s economic boom period (1940-50s) - a time of high living and rock ’n’ roll. We consider why it all went wrong in the 1960s and ask whether one event, the massacre of students in 1968, marked a loss of post-revolutionary innocence. We then look at the rise of civil society and the clamour for democracy that finally led, in 2000, to the end of the single-party State. As we’ll see, throughout this peaceful yet turbulent period the image of Emiliano Zapata has been used and abused by different groups for different ends. Dictatorships, icons, “Refried Elvis”, the summer of ’68, Zapatistas: they’re all here.

This module aims:
1.To acquaint students with the diverse range of political, economic, military, and socio-cultural problems facing the post-revolutionary governments of Mexico. Students will appreciate the government’s methods of overcoming these problems, and will be able to assess the degree to which they enjoyed success.
2.To provide an opportunity of acquiring a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it.
3.To develop the capacity for independent study.

Outline Of Syllabus

The lecture and seminar topics may vary from year to year but will include the majority of the following:

post-revolutionary education;
anti-Catholic reforms;
indigenist policies;
sport and post-revolutionary Mexico;
the Cárdenas presidency,
the ‘miracle years’ and post-Revolution generation;
the 1968 Student Movement;
the Echeverría presidency;
moves towards democracy in the 1980s;
the Salinas presidency;
the 1994 Zapatista Rebellion

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture22:004:00Introductory and revision sessions
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion511:0051:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture121:0012:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading511:0051:001/3 of guided indpendent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching122:0024:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops11:001:00Film Screening
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops11:001:00Film screening
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops32:006:00Film screening
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study501:0050:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Seminars encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral presentation, interpersonal communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability.

As and when deemed appropriate, seminar discussions and lectures will be augmented and/or replaced by the viewing of films/documentaries or other pedagogic activities

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1802A75unseen examination, including a compulsory gobbet section
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M25Essay/doc.commentary of 1,500 to 2,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The examination tests acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided, and to write clearly and concisely. The form of the resit is no different from the above, i.e. no marks are carried over from the sit to the resit.

The documentary commentary (gobbet) section of the examination tests knowledge and understanding of the texts set for the module, ability to compare and contrast related source texts on a common subject, ability to expound and criticise a textual extract lucidly, succinctly, and with relevance in a relatively brief space and under pressure of time.

The essay reveals knowledge and understanding of the texts set for the module and helps to develop skills in research, reading and writing.

No variation of the deadlines will be allowed except on production of medical or equivalent evidence.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.
All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable