Northern Institute for Cancer Research

Facilities

Facilities

Paul O'Gorman Building

This building is named after Paul O'Gorman, who died from leukaemia at the age of 15.

Funding and sponsors

This building was funded by Cancer Research UK, the Strategic Research Initiative and Children with Cancer UK.

Children with Cancer UK was founded by Eddie and Marion O’Gorman, who lost their children Jean and Paul to cancer in the same year. The building is named in Paul’s memory.

This purpose built research building was completed in 2004, costing a total of £10m, and was opened in 2005 by the late Sir Bobby Robson.

Equipment funding was kindly provided by the North of England Children’s Cancer Research Fund, Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research and other charities.

Main focus of work in the building

Research at the Paul O’Gorman is mostly centred around biological studies. Researchers here aim to identify molecular and biological differences between normal and tumour cells. This can then be exploited to design new anti-cancer drugs which can be tested in clinical trials.

Staff information

The facility now houses around 200 research staff.

Key equipment

The equipment in our building includes: 

  • Q-PCR and Digital-PCR
  • Specialist and Laser-Capture Microscopy
  • Cell Irradiator
  • Protein production
Picture of the Paul O'Gorman Building

Herschel Building

World-leading research centre into childhood cancer officially opened by internationally-renowned author Bill Bryson, patron of the Future Fund.

Funding/Sponsors

This building was funded by the Wolfson Foundation, the Barbour Foundation, the Garfield Weston Foundation, the NECCR, and as part of the Future Fund campaign.

It was officially opened as The Wolfson Childhood Cancer Research Centre in September 2016 by Bill Bryson, patron of the Future Fund, and cost £5.5m.

Main focus of work in the building

The Wolfson Childhood Cancer Research Centre is a facility where clinical and research teams from across the city can come together to advance their understanding of how to treat childhood cancers. Work at the Wolfson Childhood Cancer Research Centre will focus on developing less toxic therapies with fewer side-effects, more effective treatment options for youngsters with advanced cancer and those whose illness has returned.

Key equipment

  • Cell sorting using a BD Aria Sorter
  • FACs Analysis (BD Canto and Calibur Machines)
  • Real-time PCR
  • 3D Digital PCR
  • Fluorescent microscopes
  • HTA compliant Sample storage

Staff information

The facility now houses over 100 members of staff.

Herschel23238
Herschel Building, home to the new Wolfson Childhood Cancer Research Centre