Postgraduate

Biomedicine MPhil, PhD, MD

Biomedicine MPhil, PhD, MD

MPhil - full time: minimum 12 months, part time: minimum 24 months
PhD - full time: minimum 36 months, part time: minimum 72 months
MD - full time: normally 24 months, part time: normally 48 months

Profile

We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments.

As a student in Biomedicine you will be registered with a University research institute, for many this is the Institute for Cellular Medicine (ICM). You will be supported in your studies through a structured programme of supervision and training via our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

We undertake the following areas of research and offer MPhil, PhD and MD supervision in:

Applied immunobiology (including organ and haematogenous stem cell transplantation)

Newcastle hosts one of the most comprehensive organ transplant programmes in the world. This clinical expertise has developed in parallel with the applied immunobiology and transplantation research group. We are currently investigating aspects of the immunology of autoimmune diseases and cancer therapy, in addition to transplant rejection. We also have themes to understand the interplay of the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by a variety of pathways, and how these can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. A further research theme is focusses on primary immunodeficiency diseases.

Find out more about applied immunobiology research, projects and staff specialisms.

Dermatology

There is a strong emphasis on the integration of clinical investigation with basic science. Our research themes include:

  • cell signalling in normal and diseased skin including mechanotransduction and response to ultraviolet radiation
  • dermatopharmacology including mechanisms of psoriatic plaque resolution in response to therapy
  • stem cell biology and gene therapy
  • regulation of apoptosis/autophagy
  • non-melanoma skin cancer/melanoma biology and therapy

We also research the effects of UVR on the skin including mitochondrial DNA damage as a UV biomarker.

Find out more about dermatology research, projects and staff specialisms.

Diabetes

This area places emphasis on translational research, linking clinical- and laboratory-based science. Our key research themes include:

  • mechanisms of insulin action and glucose homeostasis
  • insulin secretion and pancreatic beta-cell function
  • diabetic complications
  • stem cell therapies
  • genetics and epidemiology of diabetes

Find out more about diabetes research, projects and staff specialisms.

Diagnostic and therapeutic technologies

Our focus is on applied research and aims to underpin future clinical applications. Technology-oriented and demand-driven research is conducted which relates directly to health priority areas such as:

  • bacterial infection
  • chronic liver failure
  • cardiovascular and degenerative diseases

This research is sustained through extensive internal and external collaborations with leading UK and European academic and industrial groups, and has the ultimate goal of deploying next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic systems in the hospital and health-care environment.

Find out more about diagnostic and therapeutic technologies research, projects and staff specialisms.

Kidney disease

There are a number of research programmes into the genetics, immunology and physiology of kidney disease and kidney transplantation. We maintain close links between basic scientists and clinicians with many translational programmes of work, from the laboratory to first-in-man and phase III clinical trials. Specific areas of interest include:

  • haemolytic uraemic syndrome
  • renal inflammation and fibrosis
  • the immunology of transplant rejection
  • tubular disease
  • cystic kidney disease

The liver

We have particular interests in:

  • primary biliary cirrhosis (epidemiology, immunobiology and genetics)
  • alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • fibrosis
  • the genetics of other autoimmune and viral liver diseases

Magnetic Resonance (MR), spectroscopy and imaging in clinical research

Novel non-invasive methodologies using magnetic resonance are developed and applied to clinical research. Our research falls into two categories:

  • MR physics projects involve development and testing of new MR techniques that make quantitative measurements of physiological properties using a safe, repeatable MR scan.
  • Clinical research projects involve the application of these novel biomarkers to investigation of human health and disease.

Our studies cover a broad range of topics (including diabetes, dementia, neuroscience, hepatology, cardiovascular, neuromuscular disease, metabolism, and respiratory research projects), but have a common theme of MR technical development and its application to clinical research.

Find out more about Magnetic Resonance (MR), spectroscopy and imaging in clinical research, projects and staff specialisms.

Musculoskeletal disease (including auto-immune arthritis)

We focus on connective tissue diseases in three, overlapping research programmes. These programmes aim to understand:

  • what causes the destruction of joints (cell signalling, injury and repair)
  • how cells in the joints respond when tissue is lost (cellular interactions)
  • whether we can alter the immune system and ‘switch off’ auto-immune disease (targeted therapies and diagnostics)

This research theme links with other local, national and international centres of excellence and has close integration of basic and clinical researchers and hosts the only immunotherapy centre in the UK.

Find out more about musculoskeletal disease (including autoimmune arthritis) research, projects and staff specialisms.

Pharmacogenomics (including complex disease genetics)

Genetic approaches to the individualisation of drug therapy, including anticoagulants and anti-cancer drugs, and in the genetics of diverse non-Mendelian diseases, from diabetes to periodontal disease, are a focus. A wide range of knowledge and experience in both genetics and clinical sciences is utilised, with access to high-throughput genotyping platforms.

Find out more about pharmacogenomics (including complex disease genetics) research, projects and staff specialisms.

Reproductive and vascular biology

Our scientists and clinicians use in situ cellular technologies and large-scale gene expression profiling to study the normal and pathophysiological remodelling of vascular and uteroplacental tissues. Novel approaches to cellular interactions have been developed using a unique human tissue resource. Our research themes include:

  • the regulation of trophoblast and uNk cells
  • transcriptional and post-translational features of uterine function
  • cardiac and vascular remodelling in pregnancy

We also have preclinical molecular biology projects in breast cancer research.

Find out more about reproductive and vascular biology research, projects and staff specialisms.

Respiratory disease

We conduct a broad range of research activities into acute and chronic lung diseases. As well as scientific studies into disease mechanisms, there is particular interest in translational medicine approaches to lung disease, studying human lung tissue and cells to explore potential for new treatments. Our current areas of research include:

  • acute lung injury - lung infections
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • fibrotic disease of the lung, both before and after lung transplantation

Find out more about respiratory disease research, projects and staff specialisms.

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics

Our research projects are concerned with the harmful effects of chemicals, including prescribed drugs, and finding ways to prevent and minimise these effects. We are attempting to measure the effects of fairly small amounts of chemicals, to provide ways of giving early warning of the start of harmful effects. We also study the adverse side-effects of medicines, including how conditions such as liver disease and heart disease can develop in people taking medicines for completely different medical conditions. Our current interests include: environmental chemicals and organophosphate pesticides, warfarin, psychiatric drugs and anti-cancer drugs.

Find out more about pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics research, projects and staff specialisms.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

We will be offering the following PhD projects:

Joint doctoral PhD degree programme in biomedical sciences

Newcastle University offers a joint doctoral PhD degree programme in biomedical sciences with the Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia (FKUI).

You spend at least one year of your studies in each university and are jointly supervised by staff from Newcastle University and Universitas Indonesia. This leads to a single award from both institutions. The development of the Joint Doctoral PhD programme has been generously supported under the Prime Minister's Initiative 2 Programme and the British Council Indonesia.

Further information on this joint doctoral research programme

Faculty of Medical Sciences
Telephone: +44 (0) 191 208 4841 
Email: biomed-international-pg@ncl.ac.uk

Related Degrees

  • Cardiovascular Science in Health and Disease MRes

    This research-based course has a taught component that is the same as an MSc. It provides a springboard into a career that involves a working knowledge of scientific research.

  • Medical Sciences MSc

    Our Medical Sciences MSc provides you with a broad education in current knowledge and research in medical sciences, medicine and dentistry at Master's level. A major strength of the course is its clinical and translational nature. Expert scientists and clinicians from the Faculty of Medical Sciences deliver the taught modules.

All related programmes

Training & Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School

Our Medical Sciences Graduate School is dedicated to providing you with information, support and advice throughout your research degree studies. We can help and advise you on a variety of queries relating to your studies, funding or welfare.

Our Research Student Development Programme supports and complements your research whilst developing your professional skills and confidence.

You will make an on-going assessment of your own development and training needs through personal development planning (PDP) in the ePortfolio system. Our organised external events and development programme have been mapped against the Vitae Researcher Development Framework to help you identify how best to meet your training and development needs.

Newcastle-Liverpool-Durham Doctoral Training Partnership

The Newcastle-Liverpool-Durham Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) is supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and offers:

  • researchers the opportunity to address scientific biosciences questions
  • an exceptional programme of research training, emphasising the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology
  • the latest technologies and facilities to deliver world-class results

Each year we award around 22 fully-funded studentships across the partnership on the following research themes:

  • Agriculture and Food Security
  • Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy
  • Bioscience for Health
  • World Class Underpinning Bioscience

Fees & Funding

2018-2019 fees

The fees displayed here are per year.

MPhil, PhD, MD

UK

Full time: £4,800 - £15,300
Part time: £2,400 - £7,650

EU

Full time: £4,800 - £15,300
Part time: £2,400 - £7,650

International

Full time: £21,000 - £31,500

Find out more about our tuition fees, including how to pay them and available discounts.

EU students starting at Newcastle in 2018 will pay the UK (Home) tuition fee for the full duration of their course.

Fee ranges

Our fee range takes into account your research topic and resource requirements.

Your research topic is unique and as such will have unique resource requirements. Resources could include specialist equipment, such as laboratory/workshop access, or technical staff.

If your research involves accessing specialist resources then you're likely to pay a higher fee. You'll discuss the exact nature of your research project with your supervisor(s). You'll find out the fee in your offer letter.

Funding opportunities

Entry Requirements

MPhil

A 2:1 honours degree, or international equivalent, in a science or medicine related subject.

PhD

A 2:1 honours degree, or international equivalent. Further research experience or a master’s degree would be advantageous.

MD

A MBBS, or an equivalent medical degree.

Find out the equivalent qualifications for your country.

Use the drop down above to find your country. If your country isn't listed please email: international.recruitment@ncl.ac.uk for further information.

English Language Requirements

To study this course you need to meet the following English Language requirements:

IELTS 6.5 overall (with a minimum of 5.5 in all other sub-skills).

Our typical English Language requirements are listed as IELTS scores but we also accept a wide range of English Language tests.

You may need an ATAS (Academic Technology Approval Scheme) clearance certificate. You'll need to get this before you can get your visa or study on this programme. We'll let you know about the ATAS requirement in your offer letter.

How to Apply

Use our Applicant Portal to apply for your course. We have a step-by-step guide to help you.

Before you apply you need to find and contact a research supervisor from the Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School Office.

Start dates

There are usually three possible start dates, although in some circumstances an alternative start date can be arranged:

  • January
  • April
  • September

There is no application closing date for this course, but specific deadlines for funding may apply.

We suggest international students apply at least two months before the course starts. This is so that you have enough time to make the necessary arrangements.

Deposit

If you live outside the UK/EU you must:

  • pay a deposit of £1,500
  • or submit an official letter of sponsorship

The deposit is payable after you receive an offer to study at Newcastle University. The deposit is non-refundable, but is deducted from your tuition fees when you register.

Contact

Postgraduate Coordinator
Medical Sciences Graduate School
Telephone: +44 (0) 191 208 7002
Email: medpg-enquiries@ncl.ac.uk

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