Full stop

The full stop is used at the end of a sentence. It signals to the reader that the writer has expressed a complete idea. For example:

English belongs to the Germanic family of languages.

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European family, which has more speakers than any other group of languages in the world.

 

A common error to avoid: Using a full stop where a comma is required. For example:

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European family. Which has more speakers than any other group of languages in the world.

‘Which has more speakers than any other group of languages in the world’ is not a grammatically complete unit; therefore, in formal writing at least, it should not be preceded by a full stop, as if it were a complete sentence. Use a comma instead.