In-text citations

If you use the author-date (Harvard) style , you need to give the author’s surname and the year of publication in each in-text citation. The author’s name and year of publication can be part of the reporting sentence (as in example 1) or can be placed in parentheses at the end of the reporting sentence (as in example 2):

Example 1: Gray (2004) argues that peer mentoring schemes can improve retention.

Example 2: Peer mentoring schemes can improve retention (Gray, 2004).

In this style, sources are listed alphabetically in the list of references.

 

In the numeric style, citations are numbered in ascending order, as in the example below:

Example 3: In past decade, there has been a considerable amount of research into the impact of peer mentoring schemes in higher education.1, 2, 3, 4 In a recent study, Gray5 found that, following the introduction of a peer mentoring scheme, retention at a large university improved significantly. A similar result was obtained by Brown.6

In this style, sources are arranged numerically in the list of references.