Undergraduate

modules

Modules

ARA3100 : The Rise of the Middle Sea: An archaeological voyage across the prehistoric Mediterranean

Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

What made the Mediterranean Sea the centre of gravity for many ancient civilisations? And why did Greeks, Romans, and Phoenicians relentlessly fight to control its coasts and trade routes? The module will address these questions by exploring the unique social and political trajectories taken by the communities who lived around the Mediterranean Sea from the Neolithic to the Iron Age, c. 7000 to 500 BC. As a part of this fascinating journey, we will explore as diverse themes as the emergence of social complexity in Copper Age Iberia, the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces at the end of the Bronze Age, and the emergence of Rome in the later Iron Age. The module consists of a combination of introductory lectures and seminars. The lectures present general overviews of cultural frameworks and social developments while the seminars provide students with the opportunity to discuss current problems in later Mediterranean prehistory.
The aims of the module are:
•       To provide students with advanced knowledge and critical understanding of the archaeology of the Mediterranean from the Neolithic to the Iron Age.
•       To provide students with in-depth understanding of cultural and social connections between Mediterranean societies in later prehistory.
•       To provide students with a critical understanding of the emergence of social complexity and urbanism in pre-classical Mediterranean civilisations.

Outline Of Syllabus

Themes explored during the module may include: the landscape and seascape of the Mediterranean; the emergence and spread of the Neolithic way of life; the Neolithic way of life in Greece, Italy and Iberia; the Copper Age in the central Mediterranean; the emergence of social complexity in Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Iberia; the Minoan and Mycenaeans civilisations; the fall of complex societies; the Iron Age in Italy; and urbanism and state formation before the Romans.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture151:0015:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion801:0080:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading201:0020:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching72:0014:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops21:002:00Writing skills session and GNM visit
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study631:0063:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDissertation/project related supervision61:006:00Student project tutorial
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures provide in-depth knowledge concerning the principal themes and subjects of the module. Seminars promote discussion over and critical evaluation of the themes covered in lectures. Student presentations and tutorials improve student communication and peer-review skills, and provide opportunities for feedback on their assignment.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written exercise1M75Student project concerning a region, period or theme in later Mediterranean prehistory (3000 words)
Written exercise1M25Powerpoint presentation
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Oral Presentation1M15 minute class presentation of student project
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Student projects enable students to work originally, independently and at fairly in-depth level on a theme, region or period of their choice in Mediterranean prehistory, from the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition to the emergence and early formation of the classical Mediterranean civilizations (i.e. Phoenicians, Etruscans, Greeks and Romans).


This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable