Undergraduate

modules

Modules

HIS2238 : Disease in Society in England ca. 1700-1900 Responses, Representations and Experiences

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module will provide an overview of the major themes and trends in the social and cultural history of diseases in pre-modern England. It will introduce you to some of the key methodologies which historians use to study disease in past societies (from social and gender history to representational analysis of diseases, from narrative and personal accounts to pathography, from geographical to epidemiological, socio-economic and demographic analysis). It will cover a range of topics, from the rise and combat of epidemic diseases such as smallpox, cholera, and tuberculosis, to fashionable diseases like gout, biliousness, nervous diseases, from how the afflicted were represented in pre-modern art and literature, to the place of religion, medicine, gender, and class in shaping notions of disease, from the role of medical practitioners and a range of lay and religious agencies in combating disease, to sufferer’s and their wider relations’ accounts of their experiences of disease. The module will be taught through a combination of illustrated lectures, seminars and workshops, and there will be the opportunity to engage with primary source material through small-group work.

The general aims of this module are:
• To provide an introductory overview of the major themes and trends in the social and cultural history of diseases in pre-modern England. The module will introduce some of the key methodologies which historians use to study disease in past societies (from social history, gender history to representational analysis of diseases, from narrative and personal accounts to pathography surveys, epidemiological, socio-economic and demographic analysis)..
• To provide an opportunity of investigating in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography as well as an opportunity to acquire a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it.
• To develop the capacity for independent study.

Outline Of Syllabus

Each week’s lecture will introduce a new concept or theme in relation to the module outline, with seminars complementing and developing the lecture, with the opportunity wherever possible to study primary source material. Workshops will develop study skills and introduce students to working more intensively with online and primary resources. Lectures may cover the following themes:

The historiography of diseases
Disease in pre-1700 England
Constitutional and humoral notions of disease
Religio-moral notions of disease
Preventing and countering: chief strategies and agencies
Consumer society and diseases
Disease and the state: from quarantine to public health, from miasmatist to contagionist approaches
Representing diseases: depictions of disease in art and print culture
Epidemic diseases: plague, smallpox
Diseases of the genteel and middling classes: fashionable afflictions
Unfashionable afflictions:
Diseases of the poorer sort
Nervous and mental diseases
Gender, sexuality and sexual diseases
Female and reproductive diseases
Masculine diseases
Children and disease
Sufferer experience and narrative of diseases

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion661:0066:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture161:0016:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading661:0066:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching81:008:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops42:008:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery22:004:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study321:0032:0020% of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire and stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills.
Seminars encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral communication, team-work, problem-solving skills and adaptability
Workshops develop communication and presentation skills, handout and powerpoint literacy skills, as well as primary source interpretive analysis, and encourage and facilitate students to locate and use authoritative online learning resources
The surgery invites individual guidance and advice tailored to suit students’ particular needs.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Oral Presentation302M2530 min in house group presentation, powerpoint with handout + 20 mins debate/discussion
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2A753,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The exam tests acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, and adaptability, the ability to work unaided, and to write clearly and concisely.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable