Undergraduate

modules

Modules

HIS3332 : The Haitian Revolution

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) is the story of the birth of the world’s first independent black republic. Enslaved people in the French colony of Saint-Domingue rose up against colonial powers and gained their freedom and independence. They created Haiti: the first fully free society in the Atlantic world and the second independent nation in the Americas (after the United States). This revolution reshaped debates about slavery and freedom, accelerated the abolitionist movement, precipitated rebellions in neighbouring territories, and intensified both repression and antislavery sentiment. The Haitian Constitution approved the settlement of Africans, Indians, and their descendants, making Haiti a point of refuge for the oppressed. In recent years scholars have increasingly insisted that much of what we inherited from the Age of Revolution—especially ideas of universal rights—were crucially shaped by the Haitian Revolution. As a revolution largely made by enslaved people of African descent, the Haitian Revolution posed a direct threat to deeply entrenched interests throughout the world, This module examines the causes, process, and consequences of the revolution.

The aims of this module are:
•To provide an opportunity to develop an understanding of the causes of, process of and outcomes of the Haitian Revolution by reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature.
• To engage with the major historiographical debates on the Age of Revolutions.
• To encourage students to think about history comparatively and to connect the histories that link societies in Africa, the Americas, and Europe.

Outline Of Syllabus

The module will include some or all of the following topics: Colonial Saint Domingue; the French Revolution and the Haitian Revolution; the slave rebellion of 1791; the French abolition of slavery; Toussaint Louverture and Jean-Jacques Dessalines; the emergence of Dessalines; the impact of the revolution on the wider Caribbean; post-independent Haiti; the memory of the Haitian Revolution.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading551:0055:001/3 of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching123:0036:00Seminars
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study541:0054:001/3 of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Seminars encourage students to analyse the assigned primary and secondary documents through the sharing of ideas and responses to the readings. Preparation for seminars require students to do private reading, requiring good time management and personal responsibility for learning.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1802A75Unseen
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Case study2M12Doc commentary of 800 to 1,000 words, including footnotes but excluding bibliography
Case study2M13Doc commentary of 800 to 1,000 words, including footnotes but excluding bibliography
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Oral Presentation2MN/A
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Class presentations are formative and help develop oral skills of argument and presentation. Documentary commentary exercises test students’ ability to conduct independent research, relate primary source documents to broader problems, ability to formulate an interpretation of evidence in response to a question, and academic writing skills.
Exams test students’ general knowledge, as well as their ability to quickly analyse a problem and formulate a clearly written answer, drawing broadly on the material covered by the course


This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable