MST2009 : Fisheries Biology and Aquaculture

  • Module Leader(s): Prof. Selina Stead
  • Owning School: Marine Sciences & Technology
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 10
ECTS Credits: 5.0

Aims

To enable students to understand the key trends in coastal aquaculture and fisheries with special reference to contemporary developments in marine resources management. To develop an appreciation of the requirement for economic, social and environmental solutions in sustainable management of the marine aquaculture and fisheries sectors.

Lectures will provide information on the biological, economic and social issues surrounding developments in aquaculture and fisheries. The module will develop an appreciation of the main focus of marine resources management in terms of food security. Students completing the module will be able to make informed contributions to the debates surrounding fisheries as a marine sector often being treated in isolation to other food producing sectors like aquaculture and the actions that have been taken to ensure that both these sectors are better integrated in supporting the objectives of policies like the EU Integrated Maritime Policy. Current changes in integrated marine management such as the impacts of the UK Coastal and Marine Access Bill and the Scottish Marine Bill will be used to illustrate how aquaculture and fisheries can be better integrated with other marine sectors (e.g. renewable energy and transport) and marine resource user activities (e.g. leisure and tourism).

Original Summary:
The module will give an introduction to why traditional marine sectors, like aquaculture and fisheries have been managed in parallel despite the two sectors sharing many similarities, for example, transfer of knowledge from fisheries has proved beneficial to many aquaculture production enterprises - in developed countries within Europe many fishers are involved in the salmon industry and in developing countries, fishers have embraced aquaculture as an alternative livelihood such as in developing sea cucumber farming in Madagascar, western Indian Ocean.

Lectures will provide information on the biological, economic and social issues surrounding developments in aquaculture and fisheries. The module will develop an appreciation of the main focus of marine resources management in terms of food security. Students completing the module will be able to make informed contributions to the debates surrounding fisheries as a marine sector often being treated in isolation to other food producing sectors like aquaculture and the actions that have been taken to ensure that both these sectors are better integrated in supporting the objectives of policies like the EU Integrated Maritime Policy. Current changes in integrated marine management such as the impacts of the UK Coastal and Marine Access Bill and the Scottish Marine Bill will be used to illustrate how aquaculture and fisheries can be better integrated with other marine sectors (e.g. renewable energy and transport) and marine resource user activities (e.g. leisure and tourism).

Outline Of Syllabus

10 x 1 hour lectures based on the following topics:
1.       Overview of world, national and local aquaculture.
2.       Overview of world, national and local fisheries.
3.       Key trends, patterns of growth and sustainable development issues of selected aquaculture and fisheries species.
4.       Characteristics of the life cycle and production systems for examples of finfish.
5.       Characteristics of the life cycle and production systems for shellfish and other commercial species like seaweed.
6.       Fundamentals of fisheries management using commercially targeted species and regional case studies.
7.       Introduction to contemporary developments and debates on integrated marine resources management relevant to aquaculture.
8.       Introduction to contemporary developments and debates on integrated marine resources management relevant to fisheries.
9.       Introducing the three pillars of marine sustainable development in the context of aquaculture and fisheries.
10.       Illustrated case studies on how socio-economic factors are considered alongside environmental issues.

2 x 6 hour field trips:

Fieldtrips contribute an important part of the module learning outcomes. One fieldtrip is to a local aquaculture production facility (exact case study depends on availability of staff and timing) and the second fieldtrip is to a fishing community, e.g. Amble – again exact location will be determined depending on host staff availability. Students are expected to research the field case studies in advance of the fieldtrips and prepare a series of questions to ask key informants at the field sites to inform the completion of their assessed report. The assessed report requires students to identify, collate and summarise relevant statistics on aquaculture and fisheries at different scales (international, national and local) and place in context to their assessment. The main aim of this exercise is to undertake a scoping study which includes a review of the key economic, environmental and social impacts of fisheries and aquaculture activities on the North-East of England’s coastal communities.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion15:005:00Revision for Exam
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion11:301:30Exam
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture81:008:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion15:005:00Assessed field report
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching12:002:00Tutorials
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesFieldwork26:0012:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study166:3066:30N/A
Total100:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures are required to convey to students the extent of the world-wide aquaculture and fisheries industries, their recent increases and decreases in growth, socio-economic importance to particular regions and impacts on the marine environment. The fieldtrips will illustrate at first-hand some of the practical constraints surrounding an aquaculture production system and a particular fisheries sector using local case study examples.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination902A70Part A 45 minutes and Part B 45 minutes
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Coursework2M30Report - 1000 words Assessed report largely on fieldtrips.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The formal examination (70%) allows the breadth (short answers) and depth (essay answer) of knowledge acquired to be assessed:
Part A (45 minutes) – short answer questions in which students choose 2 from 5.
Part B (45 minutes) – brief essay question in which students choose 1 from 2.

The assessment of the fieldwork in the form of a report (30%) provides an opportunity for an in depth analysis of the two case study sites visited and an opportunity for the staff to assess how the student has applied principles and practices introduced in the lectures to the aquaculture and fisheries sector case studies. Students will need to identify, collate and integrate relevant statistics in their report to evaluate their arguments.

Reading Lists

Timetable

Disclaimer: The University will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver modules in accordance with the descriptions set out in this catalogue. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, however, the University reserves the right to introduce changes to the information given including the addition, withdrawal or restructuring of modules if it considers such action to be necessary.