Institute for Ageing

Staff Profile

Dr Simon Tual-Chalot

Research Associate

Background

2018-present:    Research Associate, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, UK

 

With this position, I will investigate the Endothelial cell heterogeneity in health and cardiovascular diseases.

 

2015-2018:        Research Associate, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, UK

 

My post-doctoral position focused on the role of endoglin, member or TGFb pathway, in endothelial cells using transgenic mouse models.

 

2013-2015:        Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, UK

 

During my fellowship, I studied the role of endoglin, member or TGFb pathway, in cardiosphere derived cells (CDCs) and investigated the pro-angiogenic properties of these CDCs in heart repair.                 

 

2012-2013:        Research Associate, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, UK

 

My post-doctoral position focused on the role of ACVRL1, member or TGFb pathway, in endothelial cells using transgenic mouse models.

 

2008-2011:       PhD in cardiovascular physiology, INSERM U694, Université d’Angers, France

                        

My PhD focused on the role of microparticles on the endothelial function during hypoxic pathology such as obstructive sleep apnea or pulmonary artery hypertension.


Google Scholar Profile

Scopus

Research gate profile




Research

I have completed in 2011 a Ph.D. in Vascular Physiology at the University of Angers, France, in the laboratory INSERM U694 directed by Dr R. Andriantsitohaina and I gained training in the importance of microvesicles in vascular function and angiogenesis during cardiovascular disease. Prior to that, I completed a Master in Molecular and Cellular Biology, where I gained a grant from the French Ministry of Research to finance my PhD.

At this point in my research career, I became interested in the genetics of vascular disease and I approached Pr. Helen Arthur, because she had developed powerful and interesting mouse models of diseases. This interaction led to my successful award of a Marie Curie fellowship on the role of endoglin in angiogenesis and heart repair. Finally, in the past 3 years I have developed and been a co-applicant in a BHF project grant where I studied the essential role of endoglin in the cardiac function. This work has been awarded in 2016 by the Cure HHT Young Scholar Award. 

Publications