Centre for Rural Economy

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What role for public-private partnerships to deliver public goods post-Brexit?

Mark Reed’s new CRE blog post explains how Landscape Enterprise Networks (LENs) are pooling funds from multiple private investors to deliver public goods across a broader range of land uses and habitats than ever before.

Place-based Payments for Ecosystem Service schemes are broadening to new land uses, habitats and services. The UK’s Woodland Carbon Code and Peatland Code already successfully source private funding public goods delivery alongside public funding.

Now Landscape Enterprise Networks (LENs) are pooling funds from multiple private investors to deliver public goods across a broader range of land uses and habitats than ever before.

LENs build coalitions of businesses around shared commercial interest in how landscapes function to drive investment and innovation around strategic assets like soils, aquifers, access infrastructure, habitats and tree cover.

In a recent CRE blog post, Prof Mark Reed summarises existing evidence behind the LENs approach, and considers the role of public-private partnerships in post-Brexit agricultural policy.

The big idea: Government could encourage and co-ordinate with private place-based schemes alongside publicly funded schemes.

The UK has led Europe in the development of private schemes for the delivery of ecosystem services, pioneering the development of the Woodland Carbon Code, the Peatland Code and the LENs approach. These approaches have particular value in a post-Brexit policy environment where there may be greater scrutiny of compliance with WTO rules.

To learn more about LENs and the  role they can play in supporting ecosystem service delivery, read the full blog here.

Professor Mark Reed
Professor Mark Reed

published on: 30 November 2018