School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics

Staff Profile

Professor Stephanie Newell

Leverhulme Visiting Professor

Background

Steph has worked at universities in Europe and America, including Stirling University, Trinity College Dublin, Sussex University and Yale University. She has served as President of the African Studies Association of the UK, Executive Committee member of the African Literature Association, and member of the prize committee of the Windham-Campbell Literature Prizes. From 2013 to 2016, she was Principal Investigator on a project, "The Cultural Politics of Dirt in Africa, 1880–present", funded by the ERC. Currently she is Professor Extraordinaire at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.

Steph's research interests include Anglophone African print cultures, with particular attention to media audiences and readerships in colonial West Africa, and creative writing as articulated through local print cultures, including newspapers, pamphlets, novels, and magazines. She is the author of five books on African literature and popular print cultures. Her forthcoming book, Histories of Dirt: Media and Urban Life in Colonial and Postcolonial Lagos, works at the intersection of African literary studies and urban cultural history.

While in Newcastle as Leverhulme Visiting Professor, Steph will work alongside Neelam Srivastava, James Procter, Jack Webb, and other colleagues, to help build the Postcolonial Print Cultures network, and she will deliver a series of seminars and public lectures to disseminate her knowledge of archival and printed material relating to African print histories. While here, she will work on a research project called "African Print Worlds: Newspapers, Local Creativity and West African Reading Publics", focussing on the central role of African-owned newspapers in creating platforms and publics for the earliest West African creative writers in English.

Here is a recent podcast about her project on dirt: The Idea of Dirtiness


Research

Steph Newell’s research interests include Anglophone African print cultures, with particular attention to media audiences and readerships in colonial West Africa, and creative writing as articulated through local print cultures. She is the author of five monographs on African literature and popular print cultures. Her forthcoming book, Histories of Dirt: Media and Urban Life in Colonial and Postcolonial Lagos, works at the intersection of African literary studies and urban cultural history.

Ghanaian Popular Fiction

Literary Culture in Colonial Ghana

West African Literatures: Ways of Reading

The Forger's Tale: The Search for 'Odeziaku'

The Power to Name: A History of Anonymity in Colonial West Africa

Histories of Dirt

Publications