Professor Chris Day
Vice-Chancellor & President

  • Email: chris.day@ncl.ac.uk
  • Telephone: +44 (0) 191 208 6064
  • Address: Executive Office
    Newcastle University
    King's Gate
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    NE1 7RU

Professor Chris Day took up the role of Vice-Chancellor and President at Newcastle University with effect from 1 January 2017.  A Consultant Heptatologist with an international reputation in medical research, he is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.  He has served on the Council of the Medical Research Council and the Executive of the Medical Schools Council.  Professor Day was Chair of the Clinical Medicine Sub-Panel for the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) Exercise.

Professor Day is currently a member of the Universities UK Board, Chair of the Office for Strategic Co-ordination of Health Research (OSCHR), and, for REF 2021, is Chair of the institutional environment pilot panel, for the assessment of the research environment at institution level.  From 1 August 2019 , he will be Chair of the N8 Group of Research Universities.  Professor Day is also a Deputy Lieutenant of Tyne and Wear.

Contacts:

Email: chris.day@ncl.ac.uk
Telephone: 0191 208 6064

Executive Officer: Alison Pickard
Telephone: 0191 208 6061

Research Interests

Main Expertise is in liver disease related to alcohol excess, metabolic syndrome (Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD) and drug induced liver injury (DILI). Broad areas of interest within these fields include natural history studies, diagnosis including biomarkers, pathogenesis focusing on the role of the immune response and genetic susceptibility.

Current projects include:

1. The role of the innate and adaptive immune response in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

2. Genetic susceptibility to alcoholic liver disease and NAFLD.

3. The role of mitochondria in ALD and NAFLD pathogenesis.

4. Pathogenesis and significance of fatigue in non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

5. The role of NAFLD in cardiovascular morbidity/mortality

6. The role of ageing in susceptibility to liver fibrosis.