School of History, Classics and Archaeology

Staff Profile

Dr Christopher Loughlin

Teaching Fellow in Modern Irish History

Background

I am a labour historian of modern Ireland. My work has recently been published by Labour History Review (UK) (Liverpool University Press) and Cambridge University Press. I have a book in-press with the Palgrave Pivot imprint of Palgrave MacMillan, this book will be published in March 2018. My academic work is integrally interdisciplinary and combines techniques from anthropology, history, literary studies, political science, philosophy and sociology; or, to be more precise, it is fifth-wave Irish labour historiography, philosophy of Irish labour history.  


I received my Phd from Queen’s University Belfast in 2013 and it was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK). The title for which my PhD was awarded was, ‘The Political Culture of the Belfast Labour Movement, 1924-39.’ I received a J. C. Beckett Bursary from Queen's University Belfast in 2009. I was also awarded the Montgomery Medal (Interdisciplinary topic) and highest mark in the BA (Hons) Modern History pathway, both at Queen's University Belfast in 2008.


I have also consulted on a number of public history projects, helping to put together I-books, comics, animations and other teaching materials for the Creative Centenaries project, housed at the Nerve Centre, Derry~Londonderry. One of these animations won a Digital Advertising NI (DANI) award for educational animation.


https://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/christopherloughlin/

Research

My research analyses conflict, culture, revolution and counter-revolution in the construction of Northern Ireland, 1906-69. It investigates the politics, literature and sociology of working-class, labour and everyday life in both the north and south of Ireland. This research also branches out into links to the earl-modern Atlantic world and the development of globalisation and global history in the c.19th. My research links with the strategic research aims of the school, in particular, Ideas and Beliefs, Empires and After, Conflict and Revolution, and, Labour and Society. 


My first piece of research investigated the industrial relations, gender relations, strikes and industrial disputes, and government-employer-employee relations during the Second World War in Northern Ireland. It investigated the extent of the impact of 'total war' within the devolved administration of Northern Ireland, which was established during the partition of Ireland in the early 1920s. This first piece of research has been partially published in an edited collection by Dr. David Convery.


Following on from this research, I began to investigate the history of the labour movement and working-class life in Belfast during the 1920s and 1930s. It was for this research that I conducted a PhD at Queen's University Belfast, 2009-13, and was awarded my doctorate in 2013. This research has been published in Labour History Review (UK), Cambridge University Press and Palgrave Macmillan.


My present research includes:

  • Civil Liberties, Labour and the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement, 1921-39: Chapter for the editor Seán Byers, for an ICTU-sponsored publication for the 100th anniversary of the death of the Belfast Labour activist William Walker.
  • I am also currently putting together a book, conference, and edited collection on this topic.
  • Class, gender and linguistics: inter-sectional analysis of class, gender and the politics of representation.
  • Irish New Wave: Irish critical theory and Irish Western Marxism.
  • Cultural and Political Economy.
  • Empire, the Politics of Production and Northern Ireland, 1921-49/51. Masculinity, Empire, politics of production, the wages of whiteness.
  • The Words of Loyalty: Memory, Philosophy of History and the Political in Northern Ireland, 1921-39. It seeks to investigate the relationship of philosophy of history, cultural memory and politics in Northern Ireland, 1921-39. 
  • Digital history, public history and quantitative methods. My academic work is integrally interdisciplinary and combines techniques from anthropology, history, literary studies, philosophy, political science and sociology. My research investigates the social history of the political: combining investigation of both economics and politics; private/public; social and political.



Teaching

I have been working, researching and teaching in academic Irish history and public history for eight years. I have over 500 hours of module delivery, teaching assistance, lecture delivery and marking in exams on modern Irish history. I have over one hundred hours of teaching and lecturing experience on second-year modules on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Ireland. I have also taught on specialist modules about Irish history and – based on my book in-press with Palgrave Pivot – developed my own specialist course, ‘The Moral Economy of Loyalty: Loyalty, History and the Foundations of Northern Ireland, 1906-39.’ I have further delivered a number of public history courses to non-traditional learners in Northern Ireland. I consistently gain scores of 80-90% on feedback forms and aim to continually improve my pedagogy.


2017:    

10-hours contact time and 5-hours lecturing.

Queen’s University Belfast, Open Learning course, ‘The Moral Economy of Loyalty: Loyalty, History and the Foundations of Northern Ireland, 1906-39.’

10-hours contact time and 10-hours lecturing.

Design, preparation, and delivery of course for Newry City Council at Bagenal’s Castle, ‘The Warp and Weft of Herstory: The 20th Century History of the Women of Newry and Mourne.’

20-hours contact time and 20-hours lecturing.

Design, preparation and delivery of course for Inner South Belfast Neighborhood Partnership at Donegall Pass Community Forum, ‘The Stories of Yesterday: Beginning the History of the Everyday.’

2016:    

10-hours contact time and 5-hours lecturing.

Module Convenor, Open Learning, School of Education, Queen’s University Belfast, ‘Creative Centenaries: The Shared Histories and Divided Legacies of 1916 in Ireland.’

1-hour lecture, Institute of Irish Studies, ‘Representing Class: The Politics of Class in Post-Revolution Ireland, 1923-49.’

1-hour lecture, Ionad Uíbh Eachach, ‘1916: Aftermath and Legacy.’

2015:    

48-hours contact time and 3-hours lecturing.

Lecturer and Teaching Assistant, ‘Ireland in the Twentieth-Century: Politics and Society’ (HIS2012), level one, Module convenor: Dr. Fearghal McGarry, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

24-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘The Age of Anxiety: A Comparative History of Ireland and Europe in the Inter-War Period’ (HIS3109), level three, Module convenor: Dr. Fearghal McGarry, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

2014:    

48-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘Revolutions’ (HIS1004), level one, Module convenor: Dr. Andrew Holmes, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

24-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘The Irish Revolution, 1917-21’ (HIS3073), level three, Module convenor: Dr. Marie Coleman, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

2013-14:              

24-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century Ireland’ (HIS2011), level two, Module convenor: Dr. Stuart Aveyard, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

48-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘History and Historians: Contested Pasts’ (HIS1001), level one, Module convenor: Dr. James Davis, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

24-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘Politics and Society in Nineteenth-Century Ireland’ (HIS2011), level two, Module convenor: Dr. Olwen Purdue, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

12-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘The Making of Modern Britain’ (HIS2019), level two, Module convenor: Dr. Paul Corthorn, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

2011-12:              

12-hours contact time.

Tutorial Assistant, ‘Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century Ireland’ (HIS2012), level two, Module convenor: Dr. Olwen Purdue, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

2010-11:              

48-hours contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘History and Historians: Contested Pasts’ (HIS1001), level one, Module convenor: Dr. James Davis, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.

1-hour lecture and 1-hour contact time.

Teaching Assistant, ‘Socialism: The History of an Idea’ (HIS3038), level three, Module convenor: Dr. Todd Weir, School of History and Anthropology, Queen’s University Belfast.


  

Publications

  • Loughlin CJV. Labour and the Politics of Disloyalty in Belfast, 1921-39 - The Moral Economy of Loyalty. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. In Press.
  • Loughlin CJV. Representing Labour: Notes towards a Political and Cultural Economyof Irish Working- Class Experience. In: Michael Pierse, ed. A History of Irish Working-Class Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017, pp.14.
  • Loughlin CJV. The Moral Economy of Loyalty: Labour, Law and the State in Northern Ireland, 1921-39. Labour History Review 2017, 82(1), 1 - 22.
  • Loughlin CJV. Pro-Hitler or Anti-Management? War on the Industrial Front, Belfast, October 1942. In: Convery, David, ed. Locked-out: A Century of Irish Working-Class Life. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2013, pp.12. In Preparation.