School of History, Classics and Archaeology

Student Voice

Student Voice

Student Voice Committee

The Student Voice Committee (Undergraduate and Postgraduate) is made up of both staff and student representatives. Its aim is to improve communication between the two and discuss matters of mutual concern.

Any issues raised by the Student Voice Committees are passed to the Board of Studies for more formal discussion.

Details of your degree and stage representative can be found below and on the notice board in the Student Lounge in the Armstrong Building.

Please feel free to contact your UG SVC student reps 17-18 or your PG SVC student reps 17-18 ‌with any concerns or ideas. Click on the name of the representative to email them directly or contact them via the University App which you can access by logging into a cluster room PC on campus or downloading from the relevant app store (iTunesGoogle Play).

Student Voice Committee member nominations for Chair and Deputy Chair will take place during the first meeting.

Annual Reports

 

History: 'You Said ... We Did'

‌We listen to the Student Voice on History (V100) and Politics and History (VL12) – and we act on your suggestions to improve the student experience. Here are some examples of the changes made in response to your feedback.

You Said...

...We Did

HIS1025 World Empires: There is only one assessment on the module, the final exam.
We restructured the module to give students more feedback on their writing and learning of the module. A coursework assignment was added, and the exam reduced to two hours.
HIS2072 Anglo Saxon England: The focus on reading whole books at the beginning of the module is very challenging.
Reading has been broken up into more manageable sections and spread over several weeks, with corresponding changes to seminar questions.
HIS1025 World Empires: There is only one assessment on the module, the final exam.
We restructured the module to give students more feedback on their writing and learning of the module. A coursework assignment was added, and the exam reduced to two hours.
HIS2072 Anglo Saxon England: The focus on reading whole books at the beginning of the module is very challenging.
Reading has been broken up into more manageable sections and spread over several weeks, with corresponding changes to seminar questions.
HIS2140 Survey History of Japan: The assessment is too focused on the exam.
The assessment has been rebalanced as 40% essay and 60% examination.
HIS2235: The Soviet Experiment: Greater opportunities for one to one feedback and contact with the Module Leader would be welcome.
Surgery hours have been introduced, and Feedback, Guidance, and Consultation Hours have been spread over three sessions on three different days.
HIS3131 China in Revolution:  We would welcome greater opportunities for feedback.
The coursework now consists of two essays, and an open book examination.
HIS3135 The Nazi New Order in Europe: More advice on writing documentary commentaries, key to the module’s assessment, would help.
Teaching now foregrounds how to tackle documentary commentaries and revision, and this is discussed more explicitly in the module handbook.
HIS3203 Madness, Nerves and Narratives in Georgian Britain: More formative assessment of the module would aid learning.
A mock gobbet examination practice has been introduced to give students more feedback and support in preparing for the examination.
HIS3219 Living Together: Christians, Muslims and Jews in Medieval Iberia:  The assessment is weighted too much towards the exam, more coursework would support different learning styles.
The assessment has been rebalanced as 40% essay and 60% examination.
HIS3232 Civil Rights and Armalites in Northern Ireland since 1969: The module might explore different means of assessment.

A seminar attendance and participation has been introduced (20%). In addition there is a document analysis worth 25%. And finally an extended essay (2,500 words) worth 55%.