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Cracking Cholera: From Quackery to Cure

Cracking Cholera: From Quackery to Cure

Put your potions into practice by joining us on an interactive investigation into the causes and cures of cholera in the past and present with unique access to Newcastle University Special Collections and practical work with in a science lab.

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About the workshop

Put your potions into practice by joining us on an interactive investigation into an outbreak of Cholera, which happened in 19th century Gateshead. Combining the subjects of History and Science, this visit gives your students unique access to Newcastle University Special Collections and the opportunity to carry out practical work in a Newcastle University science lab.

Students will start the day by exploring resources in our Special Collections. Armed with new knowledge and inspiration, they will then hit the labs to create their own 19th century cure for cholera. Next, they'll investigate the use of magic bullets (antibiotics) and see first-hand how their 19th century tinctures affect the function of cells. Finally, students will become modern day biomedical scientists and must identify the cholera victims from a number of bacterial swab samples.

Suitable for: Key Stages 2 and 3
Subjects: History, Biology and Science
Duration: 1 day
Availability: Limited dates in the summer term

Workshop registration

If you are interested in bringing a group to this workshop please complete the registration form.

To help you plan your visit please make use of the Risk Assessment for Visits form.

What people are saying about this workshop

I found this workshop very enjoyable and active. I liked learning about the history of cholera and making my own tincture.

Student

During the workshop, they were fascinated about how little effect some of the "cures" they created had on the actual disease...

Science teacher

...To observe something like this in "real life" rather than via the Internet has a massive impact on their understanding of how science works.

Science teacher

Many of the pupils had not visited a University before and were in awe of the impressive Labs.

Science teacher