Brexit information for students

Introduction

Our international community, representing many countries from the EU and further afield, is a vital part of who we are as a University and we value immensely the contribution that you all make. We are absolutely committed to our international students, international mobility and international collaborations, and this will remain a core part of what our academic life at Newcastle is about. We will continue to create an environment in which international research and educational collaborations continue and encourage staff and students to be mobile and international in our outlook.

Amid the continued uncertainty surrounding the UK’s withdrawal from the EU, we understand our students – whether from the UK, other EU countries or outside the EU – will have questions.  FAQs are available below, which answer some of the concerns you may have around living and studying in the UK post-Brexit, fees and funding, travel and visas, Erasmus+, and insurance.

This page and the FAQs will be updated as the situation becomes clearer.


Fees and Funding

Will leaving the EU affect the fee status and financial support that is available to EU students?

In the event of a withdrawal agreement, UK governments have confirmed that EU students who meet eligibility requirements and who begin their degrees in or before the academic year 2019-20 will still be eligible for home student fees and financial support and that nothing will change for them throughout their full degree.   The Department of Education has further confirmed that this commitment would be honoured for students at English universities even in the event of a no deal

There has, as yet, been no decision on either fee status or student support for those planning to arrive in the UK to study a further or higher education course in the academic year 2020-21.  There have been no decisions on fee status or student support following the UK's full withdrawal from the EU.

See the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) website for full details.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

 

I am an applicant from the EU.  Will my fee status change from what’s on my offer? (if holding an offer for 2019 entry or deferred entry for 2020)

If you start your studies in 2019, your tuition fee status will not change.  We do not yet know what tuition fee status, and what tuition fees, will apply to EU students starting their studies in 2020. This will depend on the outcome of ongoing negotiations between the UK and the EU. We will provide updated information as soon as more details are confirmed.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

As a student from the EU, will my fee status change part way through my degree?

If you start your studies in 2019 or earlier, your tuition fee status will not change during your degree programme. We do not yet know what arrangements will be in place for students starting in 2020.

The longer-term implications for EU students who want to apply to study in the UK after the end of the transition period will depend on the outcome of the negotiations and what kind of future relationship is agreed between the UK and the EU.  UK universities are working together to influence policy in this area. We will update this information as more details are confirmed.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

 

As a citizen of the wider European Economic Area (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) or Switzerland, how will Brexit affect me?

Please refer to the information provided on the UKCISA website for information about the impact of Brexit on students from Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

 

I am a research student from the EU.  Will I still be able to apply for Research Council funding for my PhD?

In July 2018 the government announced that EU nationals would remain eligible for research council studentships for the 2019-20 academic year.  The position from 2020-21 is not yet known.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

 

Living and studying in the UK

I am a student from the EU.  If the UK leaves the EU with a deal, will I need a visa?

If a withdrawal agreement is reached, EEA and Swiss citizens can come to the UK without requiring a visa until the end of the transitional / implementation period (currently 31 December 2020 but this period might be extended). You can apply for immigration permission in the UK under a scheme designed by the UK government known as the EU Settlement Scheme. You will need to do this if you wish to remain in the UK after the end of the transitional / implementation period, or otherwise apply under another category of the immigration rules.

EU students arriving from 1 January 2021 will need to apply for immigration permission to come to the UK under a category of the immigration rules which will be in place at that time. 

Please see the government’s visa and immigration website and the UKCISA website for the most up to date information.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

 

I am a student from the EU.  If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, will I need a visa?

After the UK leaves the EU, if there is a no Brexit deal, EEA and Swiss citizens will be able to enter the UK as they do now (for an interim period).  However, following the end of free movement and before the UK’s new skills-based immigration system begins in 2021, you will need to apply for European Temporary Leave to Remain to stay longer than 3 months.

 

You do not need to apply for any immigration status or visa if you do not intend to stay in the UK for more than 3 months.

Please see the government’s website and the UKCISA website for the most up to date information.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/2019)

Do EU students need to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme?

Only if you wish to stay in the UK after 30 June 2021.  However, you may still want to apply anyway as the process is straightforward and free of charge. Having pre-settled or settled status will give you formal recognition of your status and rights in the UK.

In the event of a no deal Brexit you will need to be living in the UK before it leaves the EU and the deadline for applying will be 31 December 2020.

Please the government’s website for further information.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

I am a non-UK EU student and I am currently overseas on an exchange programme/placement.  Will this affect my ability to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme?

In order to qualify for settlement under the EU Settlement Scheme, you must not normally have been out of the UK for more than 6 months in any 12 month period. There is an exception to this if you have been undertaking a study abroad year as part of your degree. In this case you must not have been out of the UK for more than 12 consecutive months. You may want to consider returning to the UK early if the length of your study abroad year is going to be longer than 12 months. You don’t need to do this before the UK leaves the EU, but you need to ensure that you have not been out of the UK for more than 12 months before the deadline to apply under the EU Settlement Scheme (31 December 2020 in the event of no-deal or 30 June 2021 if the deal is agreed).

If you have not been resident in the UK for 5 years, you can still apply for pre-settlement under the EU Settlement Scheme but only if you are resident in the UK by the date the UK leaves the EU (in the event of a no-deal). Therefore, if you are currently outside the UK you may want to consider travelling back in to the UK before the UK leaves the EU in order to be resident here by the relevant date.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

Erasmus+/Exchanges/Mobility

What will happen to the Erasmus+ programme at Newcastle University?

In a statement on 12 February 2019, Newcastle University committed to underwrite the cost of providing Erasmus grants and in return it will continue to receive students from partner EU institutions.  Newcastle is offering a guarantee to its 2019-20 outgoing students that they will receive the same level of funding as under Erasmus+.  This will help minimise disruption to its exchange programmes and ensure that Newcastle students do not loose Erasmus funding while they are abroad.

 investing to ensure our students can continue to enjoy the #Erasmus exchange experience regardless of the outcome of #Brexit  investing to ensure our students can continue to enjoy the #Erasmus exchange experience regardless of the outcome of #Brexit

For the latest information about the University’s position in relation to Erasmus+, please refer to the Study Abroad and Exchanges website.

Watch BBC Look North report discussing the Erasmus+ support.  

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 02/05/19)

 

Will the Erasmus+ programme still be open to UK students?

In the event that the UK leaves the EU with a withdrawal agreement in place, the UK will participate in Erasmus+ until the end of the current programme in 2020.  EU funding for UK participants and projects will be unaffected for the entire lifetime of projects, including those that extend beyond 2020.

In the case of a no-deal the European Commission Contingency Regulation will come into effect guaranteeing that participants who have already started their placements at this point will be able to complete their mobilities in full and uninterrupted.  This Regulation does not cover mobility activities starting from the date of withdrawal of the UK from the EU. The UK will therefore be engaging with the European Commission with the aim of securing the UK’s continued full participation in Erasmus+ until 2020, even in a no deal.

UK universities are working with their partner universities across the EU to make sure that student exchanges can still take place regardless of the Brexit outcome.

Please refer to the Erasmus+ website for the latest information.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 02/05/19)

Will EU students still be able to come to the UK with Erasmus+?

If the UK leaves the EU with a withdrawal agreement you will still be able to study in the UK through the Erasmus+ scheme up to and throughout 2020-21.

If no deal is finalised, the EU commission has said it will seek to continue funding Erasmus+ students who are in the UK at the point of Brexit.

In the case of a no-deal the European Commission Contingency Regulation will come into effect guaranteeing that participants on mobilities will be able to complete their mobilities in full and uninterrupted.  This Regulation does not cover mobility activities starting from the date of withdrawal of the UK from the EU.

UK universities are working with their partner universities across the EU to make sure that student exchanges can still take place regardless of the Brexit outcome.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 02/05/19)

Travel

 

How will Brexit affect EU travel for UK students?

If the UK leaves with a deal, travel to the EU will remain the same as now until at least 31 December 2020. You will not need to apply for a visa to travel or work in the EU during this time.

In the event of a no deal exit, UK nationals may need to take new action before travelling to an EU destination. There are a number of issues you will need to be aware of when planning travel. The government has published information on the actions that you will need to consider, including in relation to passports, health cover and transport.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

Will UK students travelling in the EU need to have private health insurance?

If a withdrawal agreement is reached, the transition period will mean that EU and UK citizens will continue to enjoy many of the same rights as at present, including reciprocal health insurance.

In the event of a no deal EU exit, UK students who intend to use their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) must check what the arrangement is with the specific country they are visiting as the card may not be valid. This advice also applies to students studying in the EU.

In addition, UK nationals should follow current advice from the government which recommends travellers take out separate travel insurance to cover any healthcare requirements needed in any country within the EU or outside. This is particularly advisable for travellers with a pre-existing or long-term health condition.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal are there any risks for EU students who leave the UK and who do not plan to return prior to the withdrawal date?

Your re-entry to the UK is always at the discretion of UK Border Force.  However, the government have stated that the rights of EU Nationals currently living in the UK will not change with Brexit. You therefore should not have any problems re-entering the UK with an EU passport as long as you have been resident in the UK prior to date it leaves the EU. It is advisable to carry documents with you to prove your residence and studies in the UK when travelling. 

The government has published information on the actions that you will need to consider when travelling, including in relation to passports, health cover and transport.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

Will students still be able to travel in the Schengen area?

UK students should keep up-to-date with developments at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/uk-nationals-travelling-to-eu-essential-information

For current EEA/Swiss students current arrangements will not change as a result of Brexit. There may be longer queues at immigration control at ports of entry initially from flights arriving from the UK.

For international students (current and prospective) current arrangements will not change specifically as a result of Brexit.  Students should continue to check the individual entry requirements for each country they intend to visit. There may be longer queues at immigration control at ports of entry initially from flights arriving from the UK.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

Post-study Concerns

 

Will my UK degree be recognised in the EU?

UK degrees are recognised in many countries around the world, and there are a number of agreements between different countries that support this. Some of these are not related to the European Union which means that after the UK leaves the EU, most academic qualifications will still be recognised (Source: Universities UK).

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

 

Will EU students be able to stay in the UK after they complete their degree?

In the event of a withdrawal agreement, any EU student arriving in the UK before 30 June 2021 will be able to apply for ‘pre-settled status’. This will allow you to stay in the UK for five years and then apply for ‘settled status’. Once you have settled status, you can remain in the UK indefinitely. If you have already been in the country for five years you can apply for settled status straight away.

Once you are in the UK, you can apply for pre-settled status or settled status for free via the Home Office website.

If you are starting study from January 2021, you will need a visa to stay in the country.

In the event of a no deal, if you arrive in the UK any time after the UK’s departure from the EU and have applied for European Temporary Leave to Remain, you will need to apply for a visa after three years when your Leave to Remain expires.

For more information, visit the UK government’s website and UKCISA’s pages on immigration for EU nationals.

(Published: 28/03/19, reviewed: 17/04/19)

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Important message from the Vice-Chancellor concerning Brexit (6.2.19)

Dear Student

 
As the political uncertainty around Brexit continues, I wanted to write to you and to all our students to reassure you that we are taking action wherever we can and that we are planning for all eventualities.
 
The University has a Business Continuity team who make sure the organisation can operate effectively when it faces potentially disruptive events. The team has stepped up efforts recently to plan for the possibility of a ‘no deal’ Brexit, which is a scenario we would very much like to avoid. I have joined other universities to voice my concerns to Government about this prospect and its potential to negatively affect student and staff mobility and research. 
 
We have also been working through the Russell Group and Universities UK, our membership organisations, to highlight the impact of Brexit on our staff, students and research. These are all important practical measures.
 
Our international community, representing many countries from the EU and further afield, is a vital part of who we are as a University and we value immensely the contribution that you all make. We are absolutely committed to our international students, international mobility and international collaborations, and this will remain a core part of what our academic life at Newcastle is about. We will continue to create an environment in which international research and educational collaborations continue and encourage staff and students to be mobile and international in our outlook.  
 
Last Tuesday the Government published information that indicated that in the event of a no-deal scenario, British students currently on the Erasmus+ scheme will continue to be funded for the duration of their time abroad, however there is not a commitment yet to funding future students. In light of this new information from Government Universities UK International is launching an urgent #SupportStudyAbroad campaign today to ask Government to commit to continuing to fund study abroad opportunities.  You can boost this initiative by tweeting your support now - suggested tweets can be viewed here.

We want to guarantee this important part of our student experience so we will be writing to all our EU partners to reassure them that our students will be continuing to take up exchange opportunities in Europe and in return receive students from European institutions.  We feel that this exchange enriches the student experience and the cultural diversity of our campus. 
 
Regardless of the outcome of Brexit we are committed to this exchange. As a University we are offering an additional guarantee to provide funding for exchanges during 2019-20, in case there are issues with the UK Government underwriting this in the event of a no deal. We believe that this will minimise disruption to our exchange programmes and ensure that our students do not run into financial difficulties while they are abroad.
 
If you have specific queries the following people are able to advise:
Student Health and Wellbeing – https://my.ncl.ac.uk/students/contact
Research -Dajana.Dzanovic@newcastle.ac.uk
Student Mobility –Dimitra.Boutsioukis@newcastle.ac.uk
Contingency planning –gary.morton@ncl.ac.uk
Communications –carolyn.laws@ncl.ac.uk
We are committed to keeping you updated and would welcome your views.

Best wishes
Professor Chris Day
Vice-Chancellor and President 


published on: 20th May 2019