Undergraduate

modules

Modules

ARA3121 : Sex, bodies and identities in Classical Greece

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module aims to acquaint students with current discussions concerning issues of identity and its embodiment in Greek antiquity through analysis of written, visual and material evidence. It will look at the human body to understand its central role in the construction of different aspects of identity such as gender, sexuality and ethnicity engaging critically with approaches drawn from gender and feminist theory. The focus is on sex, bodies and identities throughout the extended life course, from infancy to the construction of identity after death.

Students have the opportunity to work closely with some objects from the Shefton Collection whilst exploring the module themes. The module will offer students a detailed introduction to major categories of Greek art-historical and archaeological material, demonstrating the ways in which the study of artefacts illuminates broader patterns within Greek society.

Outline Of Syllabus

Topics may include:

The material culture of children
Rites of passage
Dress and the body
The construction of femininity
Masculinity and the body politic
Pornography
Prostitution
Homosexuality
Death and disembodiment

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture221:0022:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion541:0054:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading551:0055:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching81:008:00Seminar
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops12:002:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops21:002:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery12:002:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study551:0055:00N/A
Total200:00
Jointly Taught With
Code Title
ARA8129Sex, bodies and identities in Classical Greece
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures and seminars introduce topics, material and approaches and encourage questioning of the material.
Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire and they
facilitate development of listening and note-taking skills.
The small group seminars encourage oral discussion and debate as well as the development of presentation skills.
The workshops introduce the students to the Greek collections in the GNM and draw attention
to items of special relevance for the module and prepare students for the exam through discussion of format, approaches to answering picture and essay questions and structured discussion surrounding the required content and organisation of material.
The surgeries allow for students to seek guidance for the assignment and exam.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination902A50N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M502000 words excluding bibliography
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The unseen examination tests the students' acquisition of a clear and general and overall knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided and to write clearly and concisely.

Submitted work develops key skills in research, reading and writing and assesses intended knowledge and skills outcomes including independent thinking and the ability to critically evaluate the concepts and sources introduced in the module.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable