Undergraduate

modules

Modules

HIS2228 : The Habsburg Empire

Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The module aims:

To examine the political and cultural history of the Habsburg empire in central Europe and its relations with other powers, both in the region and beyond, from the 1680s.
To consider the relationship between nation, state and 'people' in the context of unstable constitutional arrangements and political and cultural tensions, using primary sources.
To introduce a range of perspectives and interpretations, and to help students develop their own understanding of the historical and historiographical problems of Austrian history.
To provide an opportunity of investigating in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.

Outline Of Syllabus

Dynasty and territory
The siege of Vienna and reconquest of Hungary
Absolutism, Revolution and War
Metternich and the Congress of Vienna
Biedermeier and bourgeois culture
1848 revolutions
Nationalism and liberalism
Industry and urbanisation
Fin-de-siècle culture
Diplomacy and war in 1914
Defeat, revolution and the legacy of the empire

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion661:0066:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture231:0023:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading661:0066:0040% of guided independent study
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Seminars
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery41:004:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study321:0032:0020% of guided independent study
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures impart core knowledge and an outline of knowledge that students are expected to acquire; they stimulate development of listening and note-taking skills.

Seminars encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability. They allow students to develop and test their own ideas within the framework of understanding offered by the lectures.

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1352A75N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M252,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The exam tests acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided, and to write clearly and concisely.

Essays test acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem in detail, problem-solving skills, the ability to work unaided and to use references and write clearly and concisely. Also, the ability to compare and contrast related primary and secondary sources on a common subject is key.

The form of the resit is no different from the above, i.e. no marks are carried over from the sit to the resit. Students are not allowed to submit for the resit any work that they have previously submitted.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable