Module Catalogue 2016/17

ARA1030 : The Archaeology of Britain from the Romans to the 20th Century

  • Offered for Year: 2016/17
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Caron Newman
  • Lecturer: Prof. Sam Turner, Dr Patrick Gleeson
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0
Pre Requisites
Pre Requisite Comment

N/A

Co Requisites
Co Requisite Comment

N/A

Aims

In this module we will study the archaeology of Britain from the beginning of the Roman period to the 20th century. Through lectures we will survey the nature and interpretation of the monuments and material culture of Roman Britain, the early middle ages, the later middle ages, and the post-medieval period. Lectures will also be used to help students improve their writing skills (grammar, style, presentation, structure, referencing) and develop a clear understanding of best practice in the preparation and presentation of written work at degree level. Through seminars we will investigate selected topics and themes in greater depth.

The aims of this module are therefore to:
• introduce the Roman, early medieval, late medieval and post-medieval archaeology of Britain
• introduce the interpretation of the historical periods through landscapes, monuments and material culture
• improve and enhance student writing skills

Outline Of Syllabus

The archaeology of Roman Britain
The early middle ages: Anglo-Saxons, Britons and Vikings
The later middle ages: from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation
Post-medieval and modern archaeology: industry and consumption

Learning Outcomes

Intended Knowledge Outcomes

1. a basic knowledge of the most common categories of Roman, early medieval, late medieval and post-medieval archaeological evidence from Britain;
2. a basic understanding of certain key themes in the historical archaeology of Britain

Intended Skill Outcomes

Intended Skill Outcomes
1. a basic ability to recognise a wide range of Roman, medieval and later monuments and artefacts;
2. the ability to identify and use specialised archaeological publications including fieldwork and excavation reports and periodicals;
3. the ability to analyse and relate archaeological data from the historical periods to specific key themes or questions;
4. the ability to recognise common basic stylistic, grammatical, structural and presentational faults in undergraduate writing, and to self-correct written work accordingly.

Graduate Skills Framework

Graduate Skills Framework Applicable: Yes
  • Cognitive/Intellectual Skills
    • Critical Thinking : Assessed
    • Data Synthesis : Assessed
    • Active Learning : Present
    • Literacy : Assessed
    • Information Literacy
      • Source Materials : Assessed
      • Synthesise And Present Materials : Assessed
  • Self Management
    • Self Awareness And Reflection : Present
    • Planning and Organisation
      • Goal Setting And Action Planning : Present
      • Decision Making : Present
    • Personal Enterprise
      • Initiative : Present
      • Problem Solving : Present
  • Interaction
    • Communication
      • Oral : Present
      • Interpersonal : Present
      • Written Other : Assessed
    • Team Working
      • Collaboration : Present
      • Relationship Building : Present
      • Leadership : Present
      • Negotiation : Present
      • Peer Assessment Review : Present
  • Application
    • Occupational Awareness : Present
    • Social Cultural Global Awareness : Present

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion721:0072:0045% of guided independent studies
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture341:0034:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading721:0072:0045% of guided independent studies
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching61:006:00Seminars
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study161:0016:0010% of guided independent studies
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

The period-based lectures provide basic information and overviews. The writing skills lectures furnish students with key skills required to produce degree level written work. Six small-group tutorials (on aspects of the four main syllabus areas) will provide opportunities for in-depth discussion and analysis based around students’ prepared presentations.

Reading Lists

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination902A50N/A
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M502000 words
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Oral Presentation2MN/A
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

An essay and an unseen examination will test written communication skills and students' ability to relate their knowledge to some of the main themes in the archaeology of historic periods in Britain.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree unless they have compelling reasons not to do so. If this is the case, they are offered the alternative of writing one 3,000 word essay to be handed in by 12.00 p.m. of the Friday of the first week of the assessment period. This will replace all assessment work required of other students on the module. In order to take up this option, students need to discuss it with the Study Abroad Co-ordinator and their module leader, having checked with their home university that the new assessment will be accepted by them. The Study Abroad Co-ordinator will have the final say on such issues.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will require the provision of an alternative assessment before the end of teaching week 12. The alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 1,500 word essays in addition to the other coursework assessment. The essays should be set so as to assure full coverage of the course content.

Study-abroad, exchange proper and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Timetable

Past Exam Papers

General Notes

N/A

Disclaimer: The information contained within the Module Catalogue relates to the 2016/17 academic year. In accordance with University Terms and Conditions, the University makes all reasonable efforts to deliver the modules as described. Modules may be amended on an annual basis to take account of changing staff expertise, developments in the discipline, the requirements of external bodies and partners, and student feedback. Module information for the 2017/18 entry will be published here in early-April 2017. Queries about information in the Module Catalogue should in the first instance be addressed to your School Office.