Module Catalogue 2020/21

ACE3201 : Marketing and Public Policy

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Diogo Monjardino De Souza Monteiro
  • Lecturer: Professor Lynn Frewer
  • Other Staff: Dr Luca Panzone
  • Owning School: Natural and Environmental Sciences
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 10
ECTS Credits: 5.0
Pre Requisites
Pre Requisite Comment

Successful completion of a stage 1 marketing module is a requirement.

Co Requisites
Co Requisite Comment

N/A

Aims

Public policy is a field of politics and governance aiming to understand how to rule. It has been defined as “a strategic action led by a public authority in order to limit or increase the presence of certain phenomena within the population” (National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP), 2012). There are several views on what is and is not public policy. It is beyond the scope of this module to debate on what is policy. Rather, after a brief discussion of what is public policy, this module will focus on the opportunities and limitations of using the marketing framework as a policy instrument. In other words, we aim to introduce marketing as way to define strategies to achieve policy outcomes. For example, smoke cessation could be viewed as meriting public policy interventions. Note however, that marketing is mainly a business tool to encourage consumers to purchase products or services they need. So, marketing can be also an object of policy, for example by restricting opening hours of supermarkets to support small shops or forbidding promoting alcohol consumption to children. How can we define a policy based on the marketing framework to address smoke cessation? We could conceive a strategy that would include Pricing (through taxation); Distribution (restricting places where tobacco is sold); Product (limiting the amount of nicotine allowed or banning sales to under 20 year olds); Communications (public information campaigns, social media, campaigns, advertising restrictions) etc. Typically the desired outcome of a strategic action or mechanism is a change in the behaviour of consumers and/or businesses.
In general, sound policy making requires an evidence base approach upon which policies are founded, prioritised and evaluated. Marketing can contribute evidence in all these areas, including the identification of 'unintended consequences'. Marketing therefore has much to contribute to contemporary issues of public interest. However, marketing practices are also criticised for contributing to over-consumption and unethical practices.
Clearly public policy is a complex issue and can be examined (and taught) from different angles and perspectives. The aim of this class is to raise your awareness of how public policy is formulated and implemented as well as what is the role of marketing in public policy. In this class you will be taught by case study or policy issue. So, the instructors will proposed a policy topic (typically one they have or are researching), suggest readings and encourage you learn by doing. So, we will discuss different policy instruments and examine some concrete examples of public policies and discuss their implications for stakeholders.
The module will be issue based and research-led, by drawing upon both contemporary marketing-related public policy issues and research undertaken by the Social Sciences Group in the School of Natural and Environmental Scientists, where much research is food industry based.

Outline Of Syllabus

Here is a list of topics that will be covered in this class. Note that these may change from year to year:
•       Introduction: marketing and public policy
•       Social Marketing and corporate responsibility
•       Sustainable consumption
•       Public policies: the Government perspective.
•       Obesity and nutrition labelling
•       Privacy and transparency
•       Authenticity and Fraud
•       Waste and recycling
•       Debate on current public policy topic
•       Transport and road safety

Learning Outcomes

Intended Knowledge Outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to understand (at lower levels of achievement) and critique (at higher levels of achievement):

•       a range of contemporary ‘public problems’
•       a range of public policy mechanisms to address the problems
•       the application of selected marketing and consumer behaviour theories and empirical research to explain and the intended and unintended outcomes of the policy mechanisms
•       the efficacy of the policy mechanisms through an informed evaluation of the evidence

Intended Skill Outcomes

By the end of this module a successful student should have developed the following core skills:
•       critical analysis of a range of contenporary public problemsa range of contemporary ‘public problems’
•       information literacy, written communication, evidence synthesis and problem solving skills through the continuously assessed assignment
•       Demonstrate critical thinking and writing skills with respect to the analysis, interpretation and presentation of evidence in the examination assessment

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Timetable

Past Exam Papers

General Notes

N/A

Disclaimer: The information contained within the Module Catalogue relates to the 2020/21 academic year. In accordance with University Terms and Conditions, the University makes all reasonable efforts to deliver the modules as described. Modules may be amended on an annual basis to take account of changing staff expertise, developments in the discipline, the requirements of external bodies and partners, and student feedback. Module information for the 2021/22 entry will be published here in early-April 2021. Queries about information in the Module Catalogue should in the first instance be addressed to your School Office.