Module Catalogue 2023/24

HIS3295 : Royal Portraits: Christian Kings and Kingship, c. 870-c. 930 (Inactive)

HIS3295 : Royal Portraits: Christian Kings and Kingship, c. 870-c. 930 (Inactive)

  • Inactive for Year: 2023/24
  • Module Leader(s): Ms Anne Redgate
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
  • Capacity limit: 20 student places
Semesters

Your programme is made up of credits, the total differs on programme to programme.

Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0
European Credit Transfer System
Pre-requisite

Modules you must have done previously to study this module

Pre Requisite Comment

N/A

Co-Requisite

Modules you need to take at the same time

Co Requisite Comment

N/A

Aims

In general
•To provide an opportunity to acquire a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it.
•To provide an opportunity of investigating in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.
•To develop the capacity for independent study.
•To investigate in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.

Module-specific aims
•To undertake study in comparative history.
•To consider the portraits and representations, self-image and ideology of kingship of five Christian monarchs, one each from Anglo-Saxon England, the empire of the Franks, Bulgaria, Byzantium, and Armenia, spanning six decades.
•To establish the similarities and differences between them.
•To investigate the contacts between them.
•To identify the sources behind these images and ideas.
•To appraise artistic and literary source material, and the links between them.

Outline Of Syllabus

The following is a guide.

1.
An Introduction to the module at the beginning of the teaching period.
Identifying overall conclusions at the end of the module.

2.
The five case studies
Charles the Bald, Carolingian emperor of the Franks 875-77
Alfred, king of Wessex 871-899
Symeon, tsar of Bulgaria 893-927
Leo VI ‘the Wise’, emperor of Byzantium 886-912
Gagik Artsruni, king of Armenia 908-943

3.
The major literary sources that offer a representation of each monarch and of his and/or his circle’s ideology of kingship.

4.
The works of art that portray or evoke each monarch.

5.
The political context, problems and opportunities of each monarch.

6. Physical appearance and its meanings - crowns, robes, physical features, ceremonial.

7. the qualities of the 'ideal' ruler - wisdom, learning, building, humility, penitence, justice.

8. International contacts and influences - trade, war, diplomacy, pilgrimage, travel.

The five case studies will first be considered separately and in connection with the topics listed under 3.-5., as a foundation for considering them comparatively and in connection with the topics listed under 6.-8.

Learning Outcomes

Intended Knowledge Outcomes

Knowledge and understanding of the image and ideology of each of the following: Charles the Bald, Carolingian emperor of the Franks 875-77; Alfred, king of Wessex 871-899; Symeon, tsar of Bulgaria 893-927; Leo VI ‘the Wise’, emperor of Byzantium 886-912; Gagik Artsruni, king of Armenia 908-943. Knowledge and understanding of: the political context, problems and opportunities of each of these monarchs; the major literary sources that offer a representation of royal ideology; the works of art that portray or evoke each monarch. Knowledge and understanding of the similarities, differences, and contacts between them, and of their common heritage.

Intended Skill Outcomes

Students are expected to improve their ability to read quickly and with an eye for the distinction
between the particular and the general (in taking notes on the material they read to prepare
themselves for the Small Group Teaching sessions (seminars) and the assessments); to argue clearly and succinctly both in writing (in their submitted work) and orally (in their contributions to the seminars); to experience debating questions, pooling knowledge and explaining conclusions; and to manage their time (in order to prepare for the seminars and the assessments).

Students will develop their capacity for independent study and critical judgement and their ability to
respond promptly, cogently and clearly to new and unexpected questions arising from this study and
they will also develop associated skills in research, in critical reading and reasoning, in sustained
discussion and appropriate presentation of the results.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion561:0056:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading561:0056:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching331:0033:00Seminars
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study551:0055:00N/A
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Seminars encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral presentation, interpersonal
communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability.

Reading Lists

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination14402A6024-Hour Take Home Exam word limit 2,400
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written exercise2M40Documentary Commentary exercise (comprising two documentary commentaries). Word limit - 800 words in total, including footnotes but excluding Bibliography.
Formative Assessments

Formative Assessment is an assessment which develops your skills in being assessed, allows for you to receive feedback, and prepares you for being assessed. However, it does not count to your final mark.

Description Semester When Set Comment
Written exercise2MDocumentary Commentary exercise (comprising two documentary commentaries). Word limit - 800 words in total, including footnotes but excluding Bibliography.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Documentary commentary exercises in submitted work and in examinations test knowledge and understanding of the texts set for the module, the ability to compare and contrast related source texts on a common subject, the ability to expound and criticize a textual extract lucidly, succinctly and with relevance in a relatively brief space, and, in an exam, under pressure of time.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining student progress.

Examinations test acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject plus the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, to select from and to apply both the general knowledge and detailed knowledge of aspects of the subject to new questions, problem-solving skills, adaptability, the ability to work unaided and to write clearly and concisely.

The form of the resit is no different from the above, i.e. no marks are carried over from the sit to the resit. Students are not allowed to submit for the resit any work that they have previously submitted.


Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. Where an exam is present, an alternative form of assessment will be set and where coursework is present, an alternative deadline will be set. Details of the alternative assessment will be provided by the module leader.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Timetable

Past Exam Papers

General Notes

N/A

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