Newcastle University Business School

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The Economic, Social and Political Impact of the G20

Join Stephen Pursey, Director of the Policy Integration and Statistics Department and Senior Adviser to the Director-General of the ILO, as he gives insights into the way in which the G20 works as well as assessing its impact and future prospects.

Date/Time: Monday 15 May 2017, 15.30-17.30

Venue: Room 1.03, Newcastle University Business School

Since September 2008 and the onset of the global financial crisis, G20 countries have met at least annually at Leaders’ level. Over the last eight years the agenda of the G20 has steadily enlarged with Ministers’ meetings and working groups on a range of subjects even though the core business has remained economic. This intensity of policy dialogue between a diverse group of large economies is unprecedented and has generated a large volume of background reports and negotiated statements.

All but one of the Summits was attended by President Obama and it is likely that the incoming administration of President Trump will express different views on many of the topics discussed in the G20. It is therefore timely to take stock of the economic, social and political impact of the G20 since 2008 on its member countries, the world economy and the role of international institutions in the policy-making process.

As a policy adviser to ILO Director-Generals, Stephen Pursey has attended G20 Summits since Pittsburgh in 2009 and many experts meetings. His talk will offer insights to the way in which the G20 works as well as assessing its impact and future prospects.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Stephen Pursey, is the Director of the Policy Integration and Statistics Department and Senior Adviser to the Director-General of the ILO. Amongst the issues he has worked on are the impact of globalization on poverty reduction and decent work, freedom of association and the right to bargain collectively, sustainable development and trade and investment issues. Stephen Pursey worked as chief economist for the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) from 1980 to 1999. Prior to joining the ICFTU, he worked in the Economics Department of the TUC of Great Britain. Stephen will talk about the topic below: