School of Arts and Cultures

Staff Profiles

Dr Darren Kelsey

Head of Media, Culture, Heritage

Background

 

Darren Kelsey is Senior Lecturer and Head of Media, Culture, Heritage in the School of Arts and Cultures at Newcastle University.

He has a BA (Hons) in Journalism, Film and Broadcasting, an MA in Political Communication, and a PhD from the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies (JOMEC) at Cardiff University. His research and teaching combines theoretical approaches from media and cultural studies with those of journalism studies and Critical Discourse Analysis.

He is founder and editor of Journalism and Discourse Studies journal, co-convenor of the Newcastle Critical Discourse Group, and member of Newcastle University's Military, War and Security Research Group.

Darren's main research interests focus on the role of journalism in society and the relationships between media and politics. His current research in the field of journalism and discourse studies examines moral storytelling in relation to the London riots and the banking crisis. He is also conducting research into power, surveillance and national security on social media; developing and applying critical frameworks of discourse, ideology, context, and surveillance theory to analyse digital media technologies in the field of critical discourse studies.   

His past research has focused on war, propaganda and mythology in media responses to terrorism. Much of this published work has used Critical Discourse Analysis combined with frameworks of mythology to analyse the myth of the “Blitz spirit” in British newspaper responses to the July 7th bombings in London. By conceptualising the Blitz spirit as a myth, Darren has scrutinised the ways in which journalists deploy historical analogies – such as the Blitz and comparisons with the Second World War – to inform the public about contemporary, international and domestic conflicts. Based partly on this work, and other debates in current affairs, Darren is currently preparing a monograph on the ideological role of Second World War discourses and national identity after the July 7th bombings.  

He has teaching experience in the following areas: Journalism; Public Affairs; Political Communication; Media Theory; History of Mass Communication; Research Methods; Popular Culture; War, Politics and Propaganda.


Research

Research activities:

My main research interests concern discourse, power and ideology in journalism and media communications. I have recently developed a discourse-mythological approach (DMA) to Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), which I have adopted in recent research.

My recent and forthcoming publications examine: discourse, morality and ideology in the right wing press during the London riots (Capital and Class 2015); mythological tricksters, storytelling and ideology in media coverage of the banking crisis (Political Ideologies 2014); hero mythology and ideology in the discourse of UKIP and Nigel Farage (Journalism Studies 2015); discourse, power and surveillance on social media (Discourse, Context and Media 2014). My social media research has proposed new ways of adopting/adapting traditional approaches to CDA for online texts and interaction. 

I am currently preparing a Special Issue of Critical Discourse Studies with colleagues from Newcastle University Busines School, titled, The discourse of crisis and austerity: Critical analyses of business and economics across disciplines (Kelsey, Mueller, Whittle, KhosraviNik, 2016).

I am the founding editor of Journalism and Discourse Studies in which I have discussed the collaborative and interdisciplinary opportunities for research in journalism and discourse studies.

My earlier PhD research conducted a Critical Discourse Analysis of the myth of the Blitz spirit in British newspaper responses to the July 7th bombings in London. My subsequent publications and recent monograph focus on discourse and identity in relation to social class, economics, war, and responses to terrorism; scrutinising how the public are informed and represented when journalists use historical analogies, like the Second World War, to report on international and domestic conflicts.

I have previously worked on other research projects that made significant contributions to media policy and community initiatives. A project at Cardiff University, on behalf of the BBC Trust, analysed national news coverage of devolution and influenced how the BBC report devolved politics. Another project, on behalf of the UK civil service, analysed British news coverage of young black men and boys and was used as part of a government role modelling scheme in communities across the UK.  

I was a co-organiser for the Association for Journalism Education annual conference in 2013, held at Newcastle University. I also hosted a conference in collaboration with Newcastle University Business School: "The discourse of austerity: Critical analyses of business and economics across disciplines".

I am a co-convenor of the Newcastle Critical Discourse Group and a member of NUBS' Strategy, Organisations and Society research group.


Publications:

Kelsey D, Mueller F, Whittle A, KhosraviNik M. Financial crisis and austerity: Interdisciplinary concerns in critical discourse studies. Critical Discourse Studies 2016, Special Issue: Kelsey, D; Mueller, F; Wittle, A; KhosraviNik, M (Eds.) The discourse of crisis and austerity: Critical analyses of business and economics across disciplines. Submitted.

Kelsey D. Media, Myth and Terrorism: A discourse-mythological analysis of the ‘Blitz Spirit’ in British Newspaper Responses to the July 7th Bombings. Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. In Press.

Kelsey D. Hero mythology and right wing populism: A discourse-mythological case study of Nigel Farage in the Mail Online. Journalism Studies 2015. In Press.

Kelsey D. Interdisciplinary collaboration and interaction: Opportunities for Journalism and Discourse Studies. Journalism and Discourse Studies 2015, Volume 1, Issue 1, 2015.

Kelsey D. Defining the ‘sick society’: Discourses of class and morality in British, right wing newspapers during the 2011 England riots. Capital and Class 2015, 39 (2)

Kelsey D. The myth of the city trickster: Storytelling, bankers and ideology in the Mail Online. Political Ideologies 2014, Vol. 19, No. 3, 307–330

Kelsey D, Bennett L. Discipline and resistance on social media: Discourse, power and context in the Paul Chambers Twitter trial. Discourse, Context and Media 2014, 3, 37-45.

Baines D, Kelsey D. Journalism education after Leveson: Ethics start where regulation ends. Ethical Space 2013, 10(1).

Kelsey D. The myth of the "Blitz spirit" in British newspaper responses to the July 7th bombings. Social Semiotics 2013, 23(1), 83-99.

Kelsey D. Myths, Monarchs and Prime Ministers: Blitz Spirit Discourses of Royalty and Tony Blair in British Newspaper Responses to the July 7th Bombings. JOMEC Journal - Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies 2013, Vol 3 (June).

Kelsey D. Remembering to forget: Supporting and opposing the war on terror through the myth of the Blitz spirit after the July 7th bombings. Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines 2012, 6(1), 23-37.

Kelsey D. Pound for pound champions: the myth of the Blitz spirit in British newspaper discourses of the City and economy after the 7 July bombings. Critical Discourse Studies 2012, 9(3), 285-299.






Teaching

 Undergraduate: COM2035: Media, Mythology and Storytelling; COM2068: Writing for the Media; COM3077: Politics, Power and Communication;

Postgraduate: COM8164: Politics and International Relations for Journalists (MA); COM8177: Politics, Power and Communication; COM8058: Methodologies: Researching Media, Culture and Society;

I supervise PhD students and BA / MA dissertations.  

Publications