The Centre for Rural Economy is a Newcastle University Research Centre specialising in interdisciplinary social science, researching rural development and policy, food and society, and the wellbeing of rural communities.

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Read the latest news about what CRE staff are doing in their regular blog.

Latest News

Meta-analysis, science communications and shouting at the radio

Gavin Stewart, Lecturer in Evidence Synthesis and a member of the Centre for Rural Economy’s Food and Society Group, reflects on scientific debate in the public arena and his own passion for meta-analysis in our latest CRE blog.

published on: 29th July 2014

Professor Philip Lowe awarded honorary doctorate by UEA

Congratulations to Prof Philip Lowe who has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science by the University of East Anglia in recognition of the significant role he has played in national and European rural policy development, particularly as founder of the Centre for Rural Economy and Director of the UK Research Councils’ Rural Economy and Land Use Programme.  Philip, who is the Duke of Northumberland Professor of Rural Economy is shown here with the University of East Anglia’s Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Professor Neil Ward.

published on: 24th July 2014

Is there a place for the vernacular in architecture and planning today?

“A ‘vernacular approach’ to rural housing development moves beyond form and physical preoccupations to link house-building with local and regional social needs. It also reveals its neo-endogenous characteristics: it not only seeks to translate a local culture into physical form or structures, but, most importantly, to translate it into collaborative governance,” according to a new paper by Kevin Donovan, University College Dublin and Menelaos Gkartzios from Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University.  In their new paper published in Land Use Policy they use the Republic of Ireland as a case study to investigate what we mean by rural architecture and whether there is indeed a place for “the vernacular”.

published on: 15th July 2014

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