Student Financial Support

Charities & Trusts

Charities and Trusts

Search and apply for funding

There are thousands of external bodies and educational trusts with funds available for students.

Eligibility, the application process and the value of awards varies enormously between organisations.

Awards tend to be small. They are unlikely to exceed £1,000, so it is not likely that you will obtain funding to cover all of your costs from one organisation. You can, however, build up a portfolio of awards from a number of organisations. Once you have completed one application for funding, you can often easily amend and adapt it to apply for funding from other organisations.

UK students

Funding is available for many different categories of UK students.

What follows is not a complete list. Charitable and trust funding may be available from other organisations. Some organisations also offer subject specific funding.

General funding

Subject specific funding

International and non-UK EU students

A variety of charitable funding is available for you to apply for as a non-UK student.

The following list is not exhaustive. You may also be eligible to apply for funding available to UK students.

The Aga Khan Development Network provides scholarships for postgraduate studies to outstanding students from select developing countries who have no other means of financing their studies.

The Anglo-Jewish Association provides financial assistance to Jewish students to attend University and Higher Education throughout the country.

The Beit Trust provides a limited number of scholarships for postgraduate courses at universities in the United Kingdom or South Africa. Candidates must be domiciled in Malawi, Zambia or Zimbabwe, and aged under 30 (or 35 in the case of medical doctors).

The All Saints Educational Trust makes personal grant awards to teachers, intending teachers and students in Religious Studies, Home Economics and related areas.

Churches Together in Britain and Ireland helps full-time students from developing countries at British or Irish institutions. Applicants should be taking first-degree or postgraduate studies lasting a minimum of one academic year and within six months of completing their course, but facing unexpected financial problems. They must intend to return home after their current course and show that their qualification will benefit such countries.

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation awards grants in the UK and Japan in all areas of the visual and performing arts, humanities, social sciences, science and engineering, mathematics, business studies, and education.

The Nora Henry Trust offers grants to students from any country with a preference for students from developing countries who are studying subjects which will be of use when they return to that country.

The Hockerill Foundation makes grants mainly to people training in the United Kingdom to be teachers, with a priority to teaching Religious Education.

Marshall Scholarships finance high ability young Americans to study for a degree in the UK, in any field of study.

The Sidney Perry Foundation helps first-degree students who are younger than 35 years old when the course starts.

Google Europe Scholarship for Students with Disabilities provides scholarships for students with disabilities who are studying computer science, computer engineering, or a closely related technical field.

The Student Health Association Assistance Fund provides help for disabled students who are not eligible for UK Disabled Students' Allowances funding but who are studying in the UK.

The Schwab and Westheimer Trust provides educational grants and scholarships to young asylum seekers and refugees where alternative sources of funding are inadequate.