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Computing Knowledge Transfer Partnerships

Computing Knowledge Transfer Partnerships

If your business has an idea but not all the in-house expertise needed to develop it, a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) with the School of Computing can help.

Providing expert knowledge to businesses

KTPs are designed to develop or create a new process, product or service and transfer knowledge from the School of Computing into an organisation to provide new capabilities.

We work with InnovateUK to provide KTPs with corporate organisations across the UK.

Discover further information and enquire about KTPs

Case studies

The School of Computing has led many successful KTPs in recent years.

Clue Computing Company Ltd

Clue Computing Company Ltd develops, sells, and maintains intelligence and investigation management software (Clue 3).

Clients of the software include:

  • police forces
  • government regulators and enforcement agencies
  • charities
  • sports governing bodies
  • private investigative organisations

The aim of the KTP is to embed the structured occurrence net (SON) technology developed in the UNCOVER project into Clue 3 and the company. This then gives Clue a competitive advantage in the UK and international markets.

The research focus is to model processes consisting of real or hypothesised causes and their effects. It aims to represent the models intelligibly to investigators. It will also develop efficient analysis tools to support large and complex investigations.

Raindata

Raindata is based in Northumberland and develops software for the automotive market.

Its range of products and services includes:

  • the management, manipulation and conversion of data
  • the refining of data and key business optimisation
  • bespoke data management services.

The aim of the KTP is to:

  • help develop its data analytics capabilities
  • predict product longevity
  • predetermine the key points for repairs

Raindata is working with the data sciences team within the University. The business has developed mechanisms to make sense of the vast amounts of data it holds. New products and services are then developed based on this new-found knowledge and expertise.