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Power, Inequalities and Citizenship

Power, Inequalities and Citizenship

Research on power, inequalities and citizenship is a crucial component of our work in Sociology at Newcastle.

Themes

We are interested in understanding how social inequalities emerge. In particular, how they manifest themselves in both organisations and social structures and individual's life experiences. Our research is wide-ranging, looking at both long term macro-sociological trends, and micro-level analyses of inequalities of social class. Plus, other dimensions of inequality and their practical manifestations in:

  • education
  • employment,
  • other forms of social exclusion

We have particular research strengths around:

  • young people
  • employment
  • forensic scientific and medical evidence
  • masculinity
  • 'welfare', poverty, place, austerity
  • power and politics

In developing a better understanding of the complex and intersectional nature of social inequalities we also highlight the relevance of comparative perspectives. As different contexts and the study of different places reveal different configurations of inequality and power.

Research on power, inequalities and citizenship is a crucial component of our work at Newcastle. Informed and contributing to advances in contemporary social theory, our research is wide-ranging. We look at both long term macro-sociological trends, and micro-level analyses of inequalities of:

  • social class
  • ethnicity
  • sexualities
  • health

Plus, their practical manifestations in education, employment, and other forms of social exclusion.

Our work engages with different conceptions of citizenship, democracy, and power, and their interrelation.

The continued relevance of power and inequalities for contemporary citizenship is mapped across a portfolio of research. We explore how models and practices of citizenship and the politics of recognition are deployed and mobilised by a variety of groups with, through or against government.

In pursuit of developing a better understanding of the highly complex and intersectional nature of social inequalities we also highlight the relevance of comparative perspectives, as different contexts reveal different configurations of inequality and power.

The co-ordinator for this cluster is Tracy Shildrick